Psychiatric and psychological diagnoses are not tangible realities; rather, they are constructs. Cancer is a verifiable reality. A physician who diagnoses lung cancer can provide concrete proof — e.g. a biopsy — to support his verdict. But a mental health professional who diagnoses a child with, say, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder can provide no such verification.
Psychiatric and psychological diagnoses are not tangible realities; rather, they are constructs. Cancer is a verifiable reality. A physician who diagnoses lung cancer can provide concrete proof — e.g. a biopsy — to support his verdict. But a mental health professional who diagnoses a child with, say, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder can provide no such verification. Getty Images
Psychiatric and psychological diagnoses are not tangible realities; rather, they are constructs. Cancer is a verifiable reality. A physician who diagnoses lung cancer can provide concrete proof — e.g. a biopsy — to support his verdict. But a mental health professional who diagnoses a child with, say, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder can provide no such verification. Getty Images