Food & Drink

Sit and enjoy Death by Chocolate

When Earlene Huckleberry opened Huckleberry's restaurant in 1982, she, Louie Bickett and a dishwasher there at the time created a house dessert.

They wanted something chocolate and came up with Death by Chocolate pie. It became a hit with customers, and when the restaurant closed in 1988, Huckleberry continued to take special orders for the pies.

Huckleberry, who now owns Huckleberry's Chair Fetish, 319 South Ashland Avenue, will serve her Death by Chocolate pie at the store from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday. Call (859) 321-3430 or go to www.chair-fetish.com.

Legacy cookbooks

What's Cooking in Kentucky continues to be one of Kentucky's most popular cookbooks. Author Irene Hayes died in 2007 at age 90, and her family is keeping Hayes' legacy alive. Her three daughters and the husband of their sister, Karen Handshoe, who died in July, are continuing to print Hayes' two cookbooks, What's Cooking in Kentucky and What's Cooking for the Holidays.

A tabbed divider has been added to the books to include "definitions of such things as a stick of butter, a cake of yeast and soda crackers," daughter Sharon Claypool said. "We've also included can sizes, which the food companies don't use anymore."

Both cookbooks are available at gift shops and bookstores for $22.95. The book, which sold more than 200,000 copies, was first published in 1965 to pay for reroofing Hayes' church in Floyd County.

Marking a milestone

Old Forester is celebrating the 75th anniversary of the repeal of Prohibition with a one-time, limited-release bourbon. Old Forester Repeal Bourbon comes in a mock circa-1933 bottle and carries an Old Forester replica label from that era.

Old Forester became America's first bottled bourbon in 1870 and has been sold continuously for more than a century, including during the Prohibition years of 1920 to 1933. It had one of only 10 government permits to produce bourbon for medicinal purposes when alcohol sales were otherwise illegal in the United States.

Class action

If you're interested in improving your cooking skills for the holidays, take a class with Phil Dunn. Classes are $50 and are at Architectural Kitchens & Baths, 345 Lafayette Avenue. To register, call (859) 533-3553 or e-mail Phildunn@insightbb.com.

Here are the topics and dates for the classes, which begin at 6 p.m.

■ Holiday appetizers, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. Recipes are mini hot Browns, brie in puff pastry with caramelized pecans, country ham on angel biscuits, and baked mushroom caps stuffed with crab meat and shrimp.

■ Holiday baking, Dec. 15, 16 and 17. Included are Sylvia's pecan dreams, sticky toffee pudding, and jam cake with brown sugar icing.

Home-center holiday

With money tight this holiday season, consumers are concentrating on the presence of friends and family and less on the presents.

According to a recent survey conducted by Kelton Research for The J.M. Smucker Co., people are "putting out the good stuff." Many of those surveyed said they will use table linens, set out matching tableware, light decorative candles, use freshly cut flowers or seasonal plants, and place guest towels in the bathroom.

Here are some tips from J.M. Smucker, which makes Jif peanut butter in Lexington at its plant on Winchester Road, for making your home the centerpiece of the holiday season.

■ Have a family baking day. Invite family and friends over and ask them to bring their favorite recipes and all the ingredients needed to make it.

■ Make decorating the house a family project. Give the children mini-projects to do.

■ Personalize the holiday table. Place an ornament with each person's name on it by his or her seat.

■ Make the kids' table special. Add a decorative tablecloth and napkins, and make a fun centerpiece.

■ Jazz up the buffet. Make it festive by wrapping utensils in colorful napkins and tying the bundle with a ribbon. Add cards that say "naughty" or "nice." Put the "naughty" card next to decadent desserts and "nice" with the healthier options.

■ Let guests leave with leftovers. Have plastic reusuable "to go" containers on hand.

Recipes for holiday dinners are at www.smuckers.com.

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