Health & Medicine

Want a longer life? Eat more fruits, vegetables than you think you should

British researchers said that eating many fruits and vegetables, such as green beans, leads to lower rates of heart attack, stroke and cancer.
British researchers said that eating many fruits and vegetables, such as green beans, leads to lower rates of heart attack, stroke and cancer. TNS

Your mother was right. If you want to live a healthier, longer life, eat your fruits and vegetables.

And eat lots of them — as in 10 daily servings. That’s about twice as much as most health groups now recommend.

The recommendation of doubling up on fruits and vegetables is a result of a meta-analysis of 95 studies conducted by scientists from Imperial College London. The British researchers discovered that a menu that includes 10 daily servings of whole plant foods leads to lower rates of heart attack, stroke and cancer.

They estimated that as many as 7.8 million premature deaths would be avoided each year worldwide if people followed this diet. While the study did not prove a strict cause-and-effect link, it was one more notch in the healthful-eating arsenal.

So how much are 10 servings? Roughly, that’s 800 grams of produce. Or 10 small bananas or apples. Or 30 tablespoons of cooked spinach, peas, broccoli or cauliflower.

“Fruit and vegetables have been shown to reduce cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and to boost the health of our blood vessels and immune system,” study author Dagfinn Aune, of the School of Public Health at Imperial College London, said in a statement. “This may be due to the complex network of nutrients they hold. For instance, they contain many antioxidants, which may reduce DNA damage, and lead to a reduction in cancer risk.”

Some vegetables and fruits were more salubrious than others. Researchers said that apples, pears, citrus fruits, green leafy vegetables, cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower), and green and yellow vegetables (green beans, spinach, carrots and peppers) seemed to be the best.

Researchers conceded that not everyone will be as diligent in their consumption of the good stuff, but even eating some — just over two portions a day — made a difference. Consuming 200 grams of produce daily, researchers added, is still associated with reductions in heart disease, stroke, cancer and cardiovascular disease.

The study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, analyzed information for 2 million people and studied 43,000 cases of heart disease, 47,000 cases of stroke, 81,000 cases of cardiovascular disease, 112,000 cancer cases and 94,000 deaths.

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