Business

Euclid Kroger plans to reopen drive to Ashland, add parking lot

A hearing on a zoning request for the Euclid Avenue Kroger to tear down a building at 445 South Ashland Avenue is planned for Dec. 16. Store officials say the space will used for parking and to provide another entrance to the store off South Ashland Avenue.
A hearing on a zoning request for the Euclid Avenue Kroger to tear down a building at 445 South Ashland Avenue is planned for Dec. 16. Store officials say the space will used for parking and to provide another entrance to the store off South Ashland Avenue. mcornelison@herald-leader.com

Kroger on Euclid wants to tear down a 22-unit apartment building on South Ashland to give the store another driveway and more parking.

“We’ve been able to work out an agreement with the property owner to have access again and create additional parking on that parcel,” said Danny Lethco, a real estate manager for Kroger.

The grocery chain will lease the ground that the building is on, which will provide more parking and re-open a larger driveway for cars and for pedestrians. Kroger had access to the 445 South Ashland Avenue area before the new store opened in 2015.

No other changes to the traffic plan are in the works at this time, Lethco said. But the ramp to the rooftop parking on Kroger would be able to “flow right down into this access.”

Although a request for a conditional use permit said that the grocery, which was torn down and rebuilt to add space, would have a wider driveway for trucks coming in and out, that project description is incorrect, Lethco said. The access will be for customers, not for delivery trucks, he said.

A hearing on the zoning request is planned for Dec. 16. The rebuilt Kroger reopened in January 2015 after the neighbors pressed for changes to the original building plan that made the store’s footprint slightly smaller.

The development plan, approved in late 2013, resulted in Kroger losing access through the Town and Country Apartments’ parking lot, which the store had used for more than 40 years. The zoning change and removal of the building would restore that.

Lethco said building owner Louis Mulloy has worked with tenants as existing leases expired to see that as few people as possible are displaced. Mulloy was not immediately available for comment Wednesday.

The building also houses businesses, including La Petite Delicat, which sells hand-made macarons. Owner Sylviana Herrin said she received a notice earlier this month indicating she has 90 days to move her business, which opened just a year ago.

“This is a fairly unexpected thing for us,” she said. “We’re not going to let this stop us. We are working on a getting a new place. We are very optimistic and will try to find a landlord who can share the same vision for us. And even find a bigger place for our kitchen because this past year we had so many demands for our macaron classes and for birthday parties, which we can’t do now.”

She has until the end of February to get out, she said. December and February are two of her busiest times, and Herrin said it will take a minimum of two months just to rebuild her kitchen.

“This happened not in the right time; it’s very inconvenient for us,” she said.

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