In this Thursday Nov. 1, 2018 photo, Brian Mayton, a research assistant at the MIT Media Lab Responsive Environment group, holds his mobile phone receiving live stream video and audio data at a marshland in Plymouth, Mass., which is equipped with wireless sensors, cameras and microphones to create a virtual reality world inspired by nature’s rhythms. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology hope that by live-streaming data, sights and sounds at the Tidmarsh Wildlife Sanctuary, they can help scientists understand wildlife restoration techniques and let other virtual visitors experience nature remotely.
In this Thursday Nov. 1, 2018 photo, Brian Mayton, a research assistant at the MIT Media Lab Responsive Environment group, holds his mobile phone receiving live stream video and audio data at a marshland in Plymouth, Mass., which is equipped with wireless sensors, cameras and microphones to create a virtual reality world inspired by nature’s rhythms. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology hope that by live-streaming data, sights and sounds at the Tidmarsh Wildlife Sanctuary, they can help scientists understand wildlife restoration techniques and let other virtual visitors experience nature remotely. Charles Krupa AP Photo
In this Thursday Nov. 1, 2018 photo, Brian Mayton, a research assistant at the MIT Media Lab Responsive Environment group, holds his mobile phone receiving live stream video and audio data at a marshland in Plymouth, Mass., which is equipped with wireless sensors, cameras and microphones to create a virtual reality world inspired by nature’s rhythms. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology hope that by live-streaming data, sights and sounds at the Tidmarsh Wildlife Sanctuary, they can help scientists understand wildlife restoration techniques and let other virtual visitors experience nature remotely. Charles Krupa AP Photo

Live-streaming a marshland for fun - and science

November 08, 2018 01:31 PM