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UK GAINS REVENGE AGAINST KANSAS STATE

Date story was published: Sunday, September 11, 1983

The crowd's chant was "Reg-gie, Reg-gie, Reg-gie," but the message was ''re-pent, re-pent, re-pent."

With the taunts of a small, vigilant segment of the day's 56,123 crowd still ringing in his ears -- "Go play South Dakota now," one fan shrieked -- Reggie Singletary repented.

"Kentucky's on a roll; they're a good team," the Kansas State defensive end said, safe in the locker room after UK's 31-12 victory. "They got the job done."

Too bad none of Singletary's tormentors in the bleachers heard him afterward. The same Singletary who ran

Herald-Leader staff writer

The crowd's chant was "Reg-gie, Reg-gie, Reg-gie," but the message was ''re-pent, re-pent, re-pent."

With the taunts of a small, vigilant segment of the day's 56,123 crowd still ringing in his ears -- "Go play South Dakota now," one fan shrieked -- Reggie Singletary repented.

"Kentucky's on a roll; they're a good team," the Kansas State defensive end said, safe in the locker room after UK's 31-12 victory. "They got the job done."

Too bad none of Singletary's tormentors in the bleachers heard him afterward. The same Singletary who ran roughshod over UK a year ago wasn't credited with a single tackle yesterday.

He talked quietly, his comments interrupted by teammates and coaches who came over, tapped his shoulder pads and offered condolences.

Gone were the matter-of-fact putdowns of a year ago -- "No competition, too slow, comparisons to South Dakota" -- and in their place an equally straightforward but more favorable assessment of Kentucky's football team.

"They've been coached well and they're doing things right," Singletary said. "They were hitting me good, doing a lot of things good. They did a great job."

What a difference a year makes.

Yesterday, Kentucky was the benefactor of mistakes. Kentucky made the big plays. Kentucky controlled the line of scrimmage. Kentucky was the school with the stale football tradition and the fresh victory.

And, Singletary had the sour sensation in the pit of his stomach.

"It was kind of rude," he said of the crowd's parting gesture, "but I guess that's the home crowd. As far as I'm concerned, to hell with the crowd."

As was Jerry Claiborne's wish, UK's players kept their mouths shut when asked for a reaction to Singletary's year-old comments and let their ability talk.

"Coach Claiborne said we were going to save it for the field," quarterback Randy Jenkins said. "That's where everybody can see."

What the fans saw was domination, this time by Kentucky.

Now 2-0, the best start by a UK team since 1965, the Wildcats threw a balanced offensive attack that buried K-State in the first two quarters.

Three K-State turnovers (two fumbles and an interception by Scott Schroeder), plus a stroke of luck (tailback Greg Dageforde broke two tackles and broke into the clear only to trip over his own feet in the second quarter) didn't hurt, either.

Chris Caudell, one of the few bright spots for UK in 1982, tied a school record by booting three field goals, one a 50-yarder, to help the Cats take advantage of K-State's early turnovers and push out to a 24-0 halftime lead.

The rest, including two K-State touchdowns in the final quarter, became a mere formality after UK drove to a clinching score with its first possession of the second half.

"We're not 'Monsters of the Midway' by any means," Claiborne said. "Our kids are playing hard and working hard. They gave us a lot in the first half and we took advantage of it. I'm tickled to death."

Jenkins, enjoying another afternoon of pass protection, threw three touchdown passes. Sophomore Cisco Bryant caught scoring passes of 28 and 6 yards, his first two collegiate receptions. A 26-yard catch and run by backup tight end Matt Lucas provided a third TD.

Jenkins completed 14 of 18 passes, seven straight in the first half, accounting for 150 of UK's 166 yards through the air. The Cats also had 169 yards rushing.

"I love it," Jenkins said of the pass protection. "I told the whole offensive line, 'Fellas, you're doing a great job. Keep it up and I'll have a picnic back there.'

"One time, I looked at three receivers before throwing the pass."

After having to settle for Caudell field goals and a 9-0 lead early, Bryant's first reception got UK into the end zone with 10:44 remaining in the half.

UK drove 56 yards on five plays after a K-State fumble. Bryant scored on a ''streak pattern," a dash down the right sideline, but the sophomore from Bowling Green needed to curl around a defender in the end zone to get open.

"I was supposed to run through and open it up for the tight end," Bryant said. "The monster read the tight end."

So, Jenkins waited until Bryant ran around the defender and drilled a 28yard scoring strike.

UK's lead rose to 24-0 just before the half when the Cats drove 91 yards in 12 plays. The march was kept alive when fullback Curt Cochran bulled for a first down on a fourth-and-one at the K-State 26.

The Cats scored on the next play when Jenkins found Lucas free at the K- State 15. The 6-foot-4, 227-pound freshman redshirt ran over free safety David Ast at the 12 and jogged into the end zone.

Ahead 24-0, the Cats were treated to one of many standing ovations as they left the field.

"It's a new experience," offensive tackle Don Corbin said of halftime, ''getting ready for the second half when you're ahead."

During the break, Claiborne asked for continued intensity. The defense aimed for a shutout. "It was kind of disappointing," defensive end Brian Williams said of K-State's token scores.

UK settled matters by going 65 yards on 12 plays early in the third quarter. Jenkins hit four of four passes, the fourth going to Bryant.

Bryant went in motion from right to left and cut into the end zone. Free safety Jack Epps fell trying to adjust to Bryant's movement and Jenkins pounced.

The tailback was the intended receiver on the play called, but "I saw the guy fall and speeded up the count," Jenkins said.

As with last week's short TD pass to a wide-open receiver, Jenkins floated the pass short. Sliding on his backside, Bryant made the catch.

As K-State Coach Jim Dickey said, two fourth-quarter touchdowns weren't much consolation.

By then, UK had the victory and the long-awaited respect of K-State.

"We got it today," Jenkins said with a smile.

Beneath the stands on the other side of the field, Singletary said the same thing with a blank expression.

"They were coming off the ball well, staying low well," he said. "They were much more physically strong and had a lot more quickness.

"I was impressed."

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