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Lexington avoids major weather-related accidents; state to stay in ice box this weekend

Jack Brammer

jbrammer@herald-leader.com

Drone video: Just enough snow for a day full of sledding

Lexington kids chose to hit the hills after Central Kentucky's few inches of overnight snow. This drone video shows the scene from the hill near the old Shriners hospital.
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Lexington kids chose to hit the hills after Central Kentucky's few inches of overnight snow. This drone video shows the scene from the hill near the old Shriners hospital.

Lexington avoided serious problems from this weekend’s winter storm, but another blast is on the way.

The National Weather Service said Sunday’s high will be around 23, with wind chills as low as 2. Monday will bring snow showers and possible light accumulation, followed by “very cold arctic air.”

No major weather-related accidents were reported in Lexington Saturday while road crews were out in full force treating roads.

But jackknifed trucks on slick roads caused traffic problems, yet no injuries, in Franklin and Scott counties.

The Franklin County sheriff’s office said a semi-tanker jackknifed on eastbound Interstate 64 past U.S. 127 early Saturday morning and closed the road for several hours. One lane reopened at 10:20 a.m. but officers said the highway remained extremely slick.

A semi-trailer truck jackknifed at the 131-mile marker near the Georgetown exit on northbound I-75 in Scott County early Saturday and forced officials to close all northbound lanes.

The Scott County sheriff’s office said the lanes reopened shortly after 10 a.m.

Meanwhile, state transportation officials urged Kentuckians to limit driving if possible. Many major highways in the state were clear but secondary roads were slippery with snow and ice early Saturday.

The National Weather Service in Louisville reported snow totals of 1 to 4 inches across the state, with the highest amounts north and west of Lexington.

The city said Saturday evening that road crews would continue treating city streets around the clock. Lexington started the day with 3,785 tons of salt and was using about 700 tons per 12-hour shift. With 1,200 more tons to be delivered Tuesday, city officials said supplies were “in good standing.”

Lexington police responded to 47 traffic calls, including one injury collision, between 5 a.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday.

For Lexington’s city snow updates, closings and more, visit lexingtonky.gov/snowupdates and go to lexingtonky.gov/snow for information on the city’s snow plan.

Herald-Leader staff writer Karla Ward contributed to this report. Jack Brammer: (502) 227-1198, @BGPolitics

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