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Deer not in danger from recent arctic temps

Whether ankle-deep in snow or sheltered in a thicket, deer in Kentucky have handled the recent arctic temperatures as nature intended. These white-tailed deer, photographed in recent weeks along Coffee Tree Road in Frankfort, emerge daily from the woods to forage for food and take a little exercise, leaping up and downhill. They're not in danger of freezing.
Whether ankle-deep in snow or sheltered in a thicket, deer in Kentucky have handled the recent arctic temperatures as nature intended. These white-tailed deer, photographed in recent weeks along Coffee Tree Road in Frankfort, emerge daily from the woods to forage for food and take a little exercise, leaping up and downhill. They're not in danger of freezing.

Whether ankle-deep in snow or sheltered in a thicket, deer in Kentucky have handled the recent arctic temperatures as nature intended. These white-tailed deer, photographed in recent weeks along Coffee Tree Road in Frankfort, emerge daily from the woods to forage for food and take a little exercise, leaping up and downhill. They’re not in danger of freezing.

“Large mammals can handle extended cold weather as opposed to extended hot weather,” said Tina Brunjes, a biologist and deer program director for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife. “Deer are like horses. When it’s brutally cold they’ll find a place out of the wind. They raise their hair and fluff it up and hunker down.” She recently heard a report of a deer lying down and keeping warm by curling up like a cat, stretching her head back across her back to retain body heat.

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