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New printer allows police stricter control

Warren Keller, right, presented a check to Sgt. Jesse Harris of the Lexington Division of Police's Crimes Against Children unit. 
Warren Keller, right, presented a check to Sgt. Jesse Harris of the Lexington Division of Police's Crimes Against Children unit. 

The Lexington Division of Police received a grant recently for a new photo printer that will limit access to sensitive images and evidence.

The National Professional Society of Insurance Investigators awarded the $1,500 grant at the non-profit's annual seminar Nov. 15 and 16.

The money, plus $800 from the police department's budget, will go toward a Lexmark printer that will not be connected to the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government's computer network.

The printer will be used exclusively by the department's Special Victims Section, which includes the Crimes Against Children unit.

"We investigate a lot of cases involving child exploitation, which involve lewd pictures, a lot of times of children," Lt. Thomas Curtsinger said.

Detectives in the Crimes Against Children unit have to print those images for use as evidence during the prosecution of suspected child predators. The new printer, Curtsinger said, will limit the chances that those images could be accessed by someone else — for example, if a detective accidentally sent an image to the wrong network printer.

The Special Victims Section also prints photos and other sensitive evidence from adult crimes and sexual crimes.

"You want to maintain strict control of those types of evidence," Curtsinger said.

Curtsinger said the order for the printer has been placed. It should be installed in January.

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