Fayette County

Vigil for Charlottesville victims set for Monday night in Lexington

Ericka Chaves, center, whose daughter Natalie Romero, 20, is currently recovering in a Virginia hospital after sustaining injuries when a car plowed into a crowd in Charlottesville, Va., stood before a crowd Sunday at a solidarity vigil at City Hall in Houston. Romero graduated from Houston's Bellaire High School in 2016, and attends the University of Virginia. (Steve Gonzales/Houston Chronicle via AP)
Ericka Chaves, center, whose daughter Natalie Romero, 20, is currently recovering in a Virginia hospital after sustaining injuries when a car plowed into a crowd in Charlottesville, Va., stood before a crowd Sunday at a solidarity vigil at City Hall in Houston. Romero graduated from Houston's Bellaire High School in 2016, and attends the University of Virginia. (Steve Gonzales/Houston Chronicle via AP) AP

Two social justice groups have organized a vigil Monday night in downtown Lexington to show solidarity with the community of Charlottesville and to condemn racism.

The Central Kentucky Council for Peace and Justice and Kentucky National Organization for Women have organized the vigil in front of the Fayette Circuit and Fayette District courthouses at 120 N. Limestone St. The vigil is scheduled begin at 7 p.m. and will last one hour.

According to a statement posted on their Facebook page, the event will remember the people and law enforcement officers who died Saturday. Multiple people were killed and dozens were injured in Virginia after a vehicle drove into counter-protesters who had clashed with white nationalists around a Confederate-era statue in Charlottesville.

“We salute Charlottesville for their good work,” the statement from the organizations said. “We deplore white racism and white nationalism that are the root of Saturday’s injuries and deaths.”

Several other Kentucky cities held vigils Sunday for the victims in Charlottesville including Berea and Louisville.

WARNING: This video contains graphic content. Clashes between protesters and counterprotesters broke out in Charlottesville, Va. even after a white nationalist rally called 'Unite the Right' was cancelled. At one point a car plowed into a crowd of

The statues of John Hunt Morgan and John C. Breckinridge stand on the same ground in Lexington that was once one of the largest slave markets in the South.

Related stories from Lexington Herald Leader

  Comments