Fayette County

It's not all that hot? Really?

Isaiah Ray, 11, splashed with friends Friday at the Woodland Park pool. Admission prices were cut due to the heat.
Isaiah Ray, 11, splashed with friends Friday at the Woodland Park pool. Admission prices were cut due to the heat.

Water and air conditioning are your friends.

Beer and the great outdoors? Not so much.

A heat advisory is in effect for Kentucky on Saturday. The National Weather Service in Louisville says outdoor air will feel like it's 105 degrees west of Interstate 65, and 100 to 105 degrees east of that highway.

Thermometers are expected to reach 94 or 95 degrees in Lexington, and as high as 98 in Louisville and Bowling Green.

Health officials advise people to stay in air-conditioned places if possible, and to drink water instead of alcohol.

In Lexington, Mayor Jim Newberry opened heat relief centers and cut the admission price at city pools for Friday and Saturday.

Officials advised people who must work outside to pace themselves and form a buddy system to check on co-workers. Also — and this is important — never leave a child or pet in a parked vehicle.

That said, it's not really all that hot out there, historically speaking.

Tom Priddy, a meteorologist for the University of Kentucky's Agriculture Weather Center, did some quick calculations and determined that, so far, this July ranks as only the 21st hottest on record, with a lot of ties ahead of it on the list.

Counting Friday, Priddy said, only seven days this month have seen temperatures of 90 or above in Lexington.

Compare that to July 1999, when there were 20 and the city was being singed by drought.

The current heat and humidity are being caused by a strong ridge that is keeping away clouds and rain.

Sunday should be somewhat better, with a forecast high of 90 and a 40 percent chance of rain.

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