Fayette County

Heat index to approach 110 Wednesday

A hog gets a drink of water Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2010 near Maysville, Ky., while waiting to be shown in the Germantown Fair.
A hog gets a drink of water Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2010 near Maysville, Ky., while waiting to be shown in the Germantown Fair.

May was hotter than usual in Kentucky. So were June and July.

Now it's August, and guess what?

Temperatures in the mid- to high 90s prompted the National Weather Service to issue a heat advisory for a large swath of the state Tuesday afternoon. The advisory lasts through Wednesday night.

With humidity, it felt like 103 to 105 degrees west of Interstate 65 on Tuesday, and 98 to 102 degrees on the east side.

On Wednesday, the heat index is expected to hit 104 to 109 degrees.

For the Lexington area, the heat advisory expires at 9 p.m. Wednesday. In Eastern Kentucky, it ends at 7 p.m.

The heat advisory means temperatures could cause illnesses, including potentially deadly heat stroke.

The weather service advised staying inside in air conditioning.

Officials advised people to take precautions for themselves, to keep an eye on elderly neighbors and to be mindful of their livestock and pets. People should drink plenty of water and, if possible, avoid working outside in the heat.

In Lexington, city leaders urged residents who needed non-emergency relief from the heat to call 311 or 211. Admission to the city's aquatic centers was reduced by half.

"We are trying a different approach by responding on an individual basis," Mayor Jim Newberry said in a written statement. "For the past several years, when we have opened heat-relief stations, citizens have generally not used them. That happened again last month."

LexCall 311 hours are 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays. Residents may call 211 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Newberry said shelters can be opened on short notice should the need arise.

"We want to find the best approach to keep people safe," he said.

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