Fayette County

Today, it's official: Lexington's summer is hotter than normal

While protecting his head from the triple digit heat index, Blake Coldiron, Morgan Co., drank a bottle of water as he and his fellow paving crew members put down fresh asphalt on Todds Road outside of Man O War Blvd. in Lexington, Ky., Wednesday, August 11, 2010. The fresh asphalt was around 400 degrees. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff
While protecting his head from the triple digit heat index, Blake Coldiron, Morgan Co., drank a bottle of water as he and his fellow paving crew members put down fresh asphalt on Todds Road outside of Man O War Blvd. in Lexington, Ky., Wednesday, August 11, 2010. The fresh asphalt was around 400 degrees. Photo by Charles Bertram | Staff

Lexington is officially having a hotter-than-normal summer.

Tom Priddy of the University of Kentucky's Agricultural Weather Center ran some numbers and determined that, going back to 1888, the average Lexington summer has 231/2 days with temperatures of 90 degrees or higher.

Wednesday is No. 24 for 2010, and more hot days are on the way.

Temperatures are expected to hit the mid-90s in Lexington and the Bluegrass on Thursday, and they'll get close to 100 in Louisville and Bowling Green.

The National Weather Service in Louisville warned that, with the humidity factored in, much of Kentucky's outdoors will feel like 104 to 109 degrees.

The service also said prolonged exposure to such temperatures can cause heat illness in people and animals alike. Children and elderly people are especially at risk.

We've seen the advice so much this summer that it's becoming routine: Drink plenty of fluids. Stay in air conditioning if possible. Check on neighbors and relatives. Never leave anyone or any animal in a parked car.

Priddy also ran some calculations on hot summers of the past.

The granddaddy of them all, he said, was 1936, with 85 days in the 90s.

"And that was without air conditioning," Priddy said.

The 10th-hottest summer, and the most recent on the top-10 list, was 1983, when 54 days hit the mark.

This year is No. 57, but, as noted above, it ain't over yet.

"We're looking to have 90s through weekend, but to exceed our record year, wow. I don't think so," Priddy said.

Then, because meteorologists like to cover their bets, he added, "But I've been wrong before."

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