Fayette County

Friends, family say goodbye to 'Mayor of Cheapside'

Roy Stout, left, and his brother Jerry Stout ran Stout Printing, where Roy was in charge of the design end. His girlfriend, Cheryl Gillenwater, was in critical condition in Jamaica Saturday.
Roy Stout, left, and his brother Jerry Stout ran Stout Printing, where Roy was in charge of the design end. His girlfriend, Cheryl Gillenwater, was in critical condition in Jamaica Saturday.

Family and friends of Roy Anthony Stout gathered Saturday at Kerr Brothers Funeral Home on Main Street to celebrate the life of the widely known Lexington businessman and arts supporter who died Feb. 4.

"There aren't a lot of things more important than family, and Roy knew how to treat people like family," Stout's brother Mike said. "That's why you see so many people here tonight."

Roy Stout, who was 57, died when he and his girlfriend, Cheryl Gillenwater, were struck by a car while walking along a road in a resort area of Negril, Jamaica, where they were vacationing. Roy Stout's last act, family members say, was to shove Gillenwater away from the car.

Gillenwater survived, but was seriously injured. She attended the Saturday service in a wheelchair. Family members say Roy Stout saved her life.

Mike Stout said his brother apparently died instantly.

"They were walking down a road in front of an old house where a couple of dogs were. One dog ran out into the road. The driver swerved to miss the dog and ended up hitting the dog and Roy, killing both of them," he said.

Roy Stout grew up in a family of 10 children. He and another brother, Jerry, operated Stout Printing, a Lexington institution that was started more than 45 years ago by their father, H.H. "Shorty" Stout, a Lexington TV and radio personality of the 1950s and early 1960s.

Jerry Stout said Saturday that the printing company will remain in business.

Former Lexington Mayor Jim Amato and his wife, Bobbye Gayle, attended the service; they had known Roy Stout since the mid-1960s.

"We saw him grow up, and one of his brothers, Jimmy, practically grew up in our house," Jim Amato said. "They all grew up right around us."

Wayne Doller of Lexington said he met Roy Stout in the early 1970s. They played softball together, were roommates for a couple of years, and often attended concerts together.

"Back then, you had to go to Louisville or Cincinnati to see a concert, so one of us would do the driving," Doller recalled. "Roy loved music, I don't know of any kind of music he didn't like. Once, he even had a record company that he called Splat Records."

Many of those at the service planned to gather afterward for a reception at the Bluegrass Tavern and Courtyard Deli on Cheapside, a street where Roy Stout spent so much time that Jerry Stout dubbed him the "Mayor of Cheapside."

The family asks that friends make donations to their favorite charities in Roy Stout's name.

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