Fayette County

Lexington officials outline snow-removal plan

Cindy Bishop, a Streets and Roads employee, stood next to a mound of Lexington's salt supply on Old Frankfort Pike. Mayor Jim Gray said more than 7,000 tons of salt were either on hand or on order in anticipation of winter weather.
Cindy Bishop, a Streets and Roads employee, stood next to a mound of Lexington's salt supply on Old Frankfort Pike. Mayor Jim Gray said more than 7,000 tons of salt were either on hand or on order in anticipation of winter weather. ©2011

It's your move now, Mother Nature. City officials say Lexington is ready for the coming winter weather, with more than 7,000 tons of salt on hand or on order. "It's expensive, but even in tough financial times, clearing our roads of snow and ice is a priority. It's essential for public safety," Mayor Jim Gray said at a press conference Thursday, when he and Sam Williams, the city's director of streets and roads, talked about the city's winter readiness.

Lexington's snow plan involves personnel from several city divisions, coordinated by the Division of Streets and Roads.

Williams said city crews are responsible for clearing about 1,200 lane miles in the city, and some rural roads in the county. Workers will use plows, salt and salt brine to keep the roads clear of snow and ice.

About 85 city workers, plus backups, are assigned to snow-removal duty. The crews will use 17 single-axle dump trucks with plows, four tandem-axle dump trucks with plows, four salt-brine trucks, and other trucks with plows and spreaders.

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and private contractors are responsible for clearing New Circle Road and interstate highways. City crews clear main arteries including Richmond, Nicholasville and Harrodsburg, plus Man o' War, Citation and Polo Club boulevards.

The city's snow and ice priority plan identifies streets that are essential to traffic movement, and those are cleared on a priority basis:

Priority One streets are primary arteries including Main Street, Nicholasville Road and Richmond Road.

Priority Two streets are major connecting roads including Red Mile Road and Loudon Avenue.

Priority Three streets are main subdivision collector streets, including Beaumont Centre Lane.

Priority Four streets are primary arteries in subdivisions that can get residents to main roads.

For more details and to review maps of priority streets, go here.

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