Fayette County

Fix-it stations for bike repairs to be located along Lexington's Legacy Trail

Wendy Trimble from Pedal the Planet on Tuesday demonstrated one of three new bike repair stations installed along the Legacy Trail. This station is at the North Lexington YMCA on Loudon Avenue.
Wendy Trimble from Pedal the Planet on Tuesday demonstrated one of three new bike repair stations installed along the Legacy Trail. This station is at the North Lexington YMCA on Loudon Avenue.

If you're out on Lexington's Legacy Trail and your bicycle tire goes flat, you won't have to walk the bike all the way home, thanks to three fix-it stations donated by a local bike shop.

"In a clutch, you can put your bike back together and ride home," said Wendy Trimble, an owner of Pedal the Planet bike shop on Richmond Road that donated the self-service repair stations. She co-owns the shop with her husband, Mark.

The stations, a $3,000 contribution, include tools necessary to perform basic repairs from changing a flat to adjusting brakes and derailleurs and tightening handlebars. The tools and an air pump are attached to each stand with stainless-steel cables and tamper-proof fasteners.

For help making repairs, a cyclist can swipe a smart phone on the Quick Read code to see detailed instructions.

The stations are located at the south trail head at the North Lexington YMCA on Loudon Avenue, the north trail head at the Kentucky Horse Park and on the Coldstream Research campus.

The Legacy Trail, when completed, will be a 12-mile paved walking and biking trail from the Isaac Murphy Memorial Art Garden on East Third Street to the current North YMCA trail head and on out to the Horse Park. Eight miles have been completed.

The trail was intended to be a legacy for the community after the Alltech FEI 2010 World Equestrian Games. At Tuesday's news conference announcing donation of the repair stations, Jerry Hancock, director of parks and recreation, said, "based on the thousands of people we see out here each week, I would say it is living up to its name."

Also at the news conference, Eric Howard, volunteer coordinator for parks, said volunteers are needed for trail maintenance and beautification. Citizens and organizations interested in supporting the trail can get involved in the Adopt-a-Spot program to help maintain 20 garden beds along the trail planted with native flowers and grasses.

Groups can also adopt half-mile sections of the trail. This includes walking the section a couple of times each month to pick up trash and report problems, Howard said. For more information about these volunteer opportunities, call Howard at (859) 288-2984.

Other bike-related improvements to the trail are in the works:

■ Urban County Council has accepted a $589,000 federal grant with a local match for improvements to the trail, including a bathroom, benches, interpretive signs and flag poles.

■ Of that grant, $100,000 will go to complete funding of the Isaac Murphy garden. Ground breaking will occur this summer, said Keith Lovan, senior municipal engineer and project manager.

■ The city also has received a $2.7 million federal grant to complete Phase III of the Legacy Trail from the Isaac Murphy garden to Jefferson Street. Public hearings will be conducted this year to help find the best route for the trail, which will be on public streets, Lovan said. Work on that section of the trail will be done in 2013.

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