Scott County

Proposed Scott County landfill expansion generates opposition

Garbage trucks entered a landfill on U.S. 25 north of Georgetown in Scott Co., Ky, on Sept. 23, 2016. Scott County residents have been complaining for years about the garbage trucks speeding down U.S. 25. A hearing on the landfill expansion is scheduled for 7 p.m. Jan. 11 at Scott County High School.
Garbage trucks entered a landfill on U.S. 25 north of Georgetown in Scott Co., Ky, on Sept. 23, 2016. Scott County residents have been complaining for years about the garbage trucks speeding down U.S. 25. A hearing on the landfill expansion is scheduled for 7 p.m. Jan. 11 at Scott County High School. palcala@herald-leader.com

An application to expand the Central Kentucky Landfill near Sadieville in Scott County has some residents concerned about their health and safety.

The application, submitted by Waste Services of the Bluegrass, asks to increase the waste disposal area in the landfill to about 75.5 acres from its current disposal area of 46.8 acres.

Waste Services of the Bluegrass also wants to increase the boundary surrounding the landfill from 102.8 acres to 602 acres. According to Chief Operating Officer Greg Elkins, the waste disposal area will be a “horizontal expansion” and the landfill boundary will only be used for borrow and buffer area.

However, Norris Stacy, a Scott County resident who served as mayor of Sadieville in the early ’90s, said he is concerned the expansion will result in decreased property values in the area and increased truck traffic on U.S. 25, which is used as an access road to the landfill.

A public hearing about the expansion, scheduled by the Energy and Environment Cabinet, will be held at Scott County High School at 7 p.m. on Jan. 11.

The landfill doesn’t contain only Scott County’s trash. In 2015, Fayette County contracted with Waste Services of the Bluegrass to send between 183 and 223 truckloads of trash each week to the Central Kentucky Landfill.

Large trucks driving down the two-lane road with narrow shoulders has been a concern for Scott County residents. Last September, a woman died in an accident involving two garbage trucks.

A website opposing the landfill has been created. An online petition on the website lists increased air, water and noise pollution as possible effects from the expansion, having a negative affect on human health, plants and animals.

Stacy is also concerned about what agency is monitoring the landfill, citing a situation in Estill County where 1,600 to 1,800 tons of low-level radioactive waste was illegally dumped as an example of what can happen when landfills remain unchecked, he said.

Stephen Porter, a lawyer based in Louisville, thinks the possible expansion of the landfill goes against the county’s zoning laws.

“This is a big issue,” Stacy said. “When you get to really digging into it, I think there’s a lot of problems here.”

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