Scott County

Scott County to reschedule landfill hearing in a bigger room

The expansion of Central Kentucky Landfill in Scott County has been a controversial issue in the area for the past few months.
The expansion of Central Kentucky Landfill in Scott County has been a controversial issue in the area for the past few months. palcala@herald-leader.com

The heavily anticipated Board of Adjustment meeting in Scott County Thursday has been canceled, but will be rescheduled.

The need for a larger venue is one reason for the rescheduling, said Matt Summers, Planner II of the Georgetown/Scott County Planning Commission.

The meeting was originally to be held at the Scott County Courthouse in a room that seats about 50 people, Summers said. The meeting is expected to be heavily attended because it involves an appeal that the land for the Central Kentucky Landfill expansion will require rezoning.

As of Tuesday, the new date and location of the meeting had not been set.

Waste Services of the Bluegrass, which owns the landfill, is asking permission from the Kentucky Division of Waste Management to expand the waste disposal area to about 75.5 acres from 46.8 acres. The company also wants to increase the boundary surrounding the landfill — to be used as a borrow and buffer area — from 102.8 acres to 602 acres.

Joe Kane, executive director of the Georgetown/Scott County Planning Commission, sent a letter in January informing Waste Services of the Bluegrass that it would need to apply for a zoning change if it wishes to expand its landfill. The landfill is currently zoned for agricultural use.

The area for the proposed landfill expansion must be rezoned to light industrial with a conditional use permit or to heavy industrial. Waste Services of the Bluegrass appealed Kane’s decision afterward.

The landfill accepts trash from numerous counties in Ohio and Kentucky, including from Lexington.

The controversy surrounding the Central Kentucky Landfill expansion has been ongoing. In January, a public hearing about the expansion was attended by about 300 people. The overwhelming majority opposed it. Scott County residents cited concerns such as increased traffic, odor and decreased property values.

In February, about 20 people protested the proposed landfill expansion. Several calls to action have also been issued through the Scott County Neighbors for Safety and Health Facebook page, prompting opponents of the landfill expansion to attend public meetings and contact public officials about the expansion. The page also features users sharing media stories about landfill issues in other areas.

The Georgetown-Scott County Planning Commission plans to announce the time and location of meeting on its Facebook page once it is determined.

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