Scott County

Georgetown OKs ordinance spurred by Camping World’s plan for huge flag

The Georgetown City Council passed a new sign ordinance that would allow for non-commercial flags to be flown with a conditional use permit. Under the old ordinance, flags over a certain height could be considered a sign.
The Georgetown City Council passed a new sign ordinance that would allow for non-commercial flags to be flown with a conditional use permit. Under the old ordinance, flags over a certain height could be considered a sign. tcrumbie@herald-leader.com

The Georgetown City Council took the next step Monday toward allowing Camping World to fly a large American flag and a high-rise sign at its future store in Scott County.

The council unanimously passed a second reading of an updated ordinance Monday.

Under the new ordinance, Georgetown would allow non-commercial flags that are more than 32 square feet or higher than 32 feet to be flown with a conditional use permit in certain zoning districts. Previously, a flag bigger than that could be considered a sign.

The ordinance change comes after Camping World CEO Marcus Lemonis tweeted in April about Georgetown not allowing the American flag at the new Camping World, near Interstate 75, set to open this summer. The flagpole, which was to be 130 feet tall, was denied by the Georgetown Board of Adjustment in January because it was taller than 32 feet. Camping World had already been approved for a high-rise sign, and Georgetown allows for only one interstate sign per location. Camping World has a large American flag at many of its stores.

An additional provision in the ordinance states that when a commercial flag is greater than 32 square feet or higher than 32 feet, it’s considered an interstate sign. An example of a commercial flag would be a flag displaying a company logo.

Camping World’s next step

Camping World has submitted an application for a 150-foot flagpole to fly a 5,000-square-foot American flag. The board of adjustment will consider the application at a June 5 meeting. For comparison, an NBA basketball court is 4,700 square feet, and the Statue of Liberty is 151 feet tall from toe to torch.

Under the current ordinance, interstate signs are capped at 110 feet high, and each side can be no more than 150 square feet. The new ordinance doesn’t explicitly limit height or square footage of a non-commercial flag, but the board of adjustment has the discretion to do so.

Once published in Georgetown’s newspaper, the News-Graphic, the revised ordinance will become law.

  Comments