Scott County

Lexington has received 25.6 inches of snow this winter

Canada geese and horse shared a snowy field on the Mill Ridge Farm at the corner of Parkers Mill Rd and Man O War Blvd. in Lexington, Ky., Monday, February 7, 2011. The National Weather Service issued a winter weather advisory for Kentucky as a cold front brought snow and frigid temperatures to the state. Charles Bertram | Staff
Canada geese and horse shared a snowy field on the Mill Ridge Farm at the corner of Parkers Mill Rd and Man O War Blvd. in Lexington, Ky., Monday, February 7, 2011. The National Weather Service issued a winter weather advisory for Kentucky as a cold front brought snow and frigid temperatures to the state. Charles Bertram | Staff

An endless winter persisted across Kentucky on Monday, apparently to the tune of a broken record, as snow fell yet again.

It has been such a busy winter that road crews throughout the state have dished out more salt this year than for entire winters of previous years.

Lexington had received 1.5 inches of snow by 7 p.m. Monday, with a total expected accumulation of 2 to 4 inches, said Don Kirkpatrick, meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Louisville.

That was nothing compared to far Western Kentucky, though, where the National Weather Service in Paducah said parts of Marshall County received 8 to 10 inches.

Kirkpatrick said Lexington could see more flurries early Tuesday, and drivers could find slick roads during their morning commute.

Tuesday is expected to be mostly cloudy in the morning, becoming partly sunny in the afternoon. It'll be cold, though, with a high of about 25.

Meteorologist John Denman of the weather service in Louisville said a total of 10 inches of snow is normal for Lexington by this time of year. As of Monday evening, the city had received 25.6 inches. Still, that was far from the record for snowfall in a year, which was 60 inches, in 1917.

Trying to keep the snow and ice at bay, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has used a record 417,000 tons of salt this season. The previous record was set last year, when state crews used 373,000 tons.

Lexington-Fayette County crews have put down about 12,500 tons of salt and normally use about 10,000 to 12,000 tons a season, city spokeswoman Susan Straub said.

Other Central Kentucky communities have seen similar road-salt records. The Jessamine County road department has used about 563 tons of salt this winter, dispatcher Glenn Donald said. Asked whether that was more than last year, he replied, "a lot more."

Donald said county road crews used about 400 tons last winter.

Madison County has used 4,100 tons this year, compared to 3,000 tons in both 2010 and 2009.

J.R. Brandenburg, supervisor of Scott County's road department, said crews have used about 2,000 tons of salt to clear 250 miles of county roads this winter.

"That's more than we normally use," Brandenburg said. "And we still have another month to go."

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