Crime

Kentucky Mr. Basketball finalist, all-star football player accused of vandalizing school.

In this 2015 file photo, Anderson County's Blake Franklin played Franklin County.
In this 2015 file photo, Anderson County's Blake Franklin played Franklin County.

Two former star athletes at Anderson County High School were among four men charged after athletic facilities were vandalized at the school from which most of them recently graduated.

Blake Franklin, Cobe Penny, Brandon Ball and Anthony Bryan, all 18, were arrested Tuesday and each face various burglary and mischief charges for vandalizing the Anderson County High School's baseball and football fieldhouses overnight May 31, according to the sheriff's office. All of the men except Bryan are 2018 graduates of the high school.

The school suffered $2,200 worth of damage, including smashed lockers, holes in the walls and damage to players' equipment, the sheriff's office said.

Franklin, who earned a spot on Kentucky's All-Star Football Team in January after scoring 21 touchdowns a season ago, has signed with Georgetown College to continue his football career. He was charged with two counts of third-degree burglary; first-degree criminal mischief; and second-degree criminal mischief.

Georgetown has not commented on Franklin's arrest.

Penny scored 2,251 points in his basketball career to become the school's all-time leading scorer, according to the Anderson News. He was charged with third-degree burglary and second-degree criminal mischief. Earlier this month, the Bellarmine University signee and Mr. Basketball finalist played for the Kentucky All-Star team in its series against Indiana.

"We are aware of the arrest, and we trust the officials in Anderson County to handle the situation appropriately," a spokesperson for Bellarmine said.

Ball was charged with two counts of third-degree burglary; first-degree criminal mischief; and second-degree criminal mischief. Bryan, of Nelson County, was charged with third-degree burglary and second-degree criminal mischief.

With the exception of identical twins, each person has a unique DNA profile. This makes DNA matching a powerful tool for finding and convicting the perpetrator of a crime.

  Comments