Crime

Friends, family of slain Lexington man hold candlelight vigil

Nallely Romero, left, and Jenny Romero, daughters of slaying victim Librado Romero, listened during Thursday's vigil. The ex-boyfriend of Nallely Romero has been charged with murder in her father's death.
Nallely Romero, left, and Jenny Romero, daughters of slaying victim Librado Romero, listened during Thursday's vigil. The ex-boyfriend of Nallely Romero has been charged with murder in her father's death.

About 50 people gathered at Robert F. Stephens Courthouse Plaza in downtown Lexington on Thursday for a candlelight vigil for Librado Romero, a Lexington man who was shot to death last week in what is being called an act of domestic violence.

Among friends, family and supporters in attendance was Romero's wife Maria, who was shot several times in the May 7 attack. She wore a bandage over a bullet wound on her neck.

Maria Romero tearfully addressed the crowd in Spanish, imploring them not to stand for domestic violence. Her son Ulises translated.

"She said that the only thing she asks of you all is for you not to be quiet, to speak up, so that anything like this doesn't happen to you," he said, his arm on his mother's shoulder.

Librado Romero, his wife, and his daughter Nallely were shot at their Wayland Drive home. Nallely's ex-boyfriend, Edgar Noel Vieyra, has been charged with murder, assault and other charges. Vieyra and Nallely Romero had three children.

Family have said Vieyra was upset because Nallely took out a domestic violence order against him the week before the shooting. He was forbidden from being within 500 feet of Nallely, their children or their home, and was told not to own any guns.

Speakers at the vigil included workers from the Bluegrass Domestic Violence Program and the Brenda D. Cowan Coalition, which organized the vigil. They spoke of Librado Romero as a dedicated father who died trying to protect his family.

Also Thursday, Librado Romero's ashes were returned to his family following his funeral Saturday. It was the first time, the family said, that his death seemed real.

"It hit us all right then and there," said his daughter Jenny. "When they gave us his ashes back, you know, he's not going to come back."

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