Education

Workforce projects to share $33 million in second round of ‘Work Ready’

Hal Heiner, secretary of the Education and Workforce Development, announced $33 million in the second round of funding for workforce development projects around the state.
Hal Heiner, secretary of the Education and Workforce Development, announced $33 million in the second round of funding for workforce development projects around the state. Herald-Leader

Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration has awarded $33 million to 15 projects around the state in the second round of funding for the Work Ready Skills Initiative.

Most of the projects are building or technology upgrades that will help school districts produce a highly-trained workforce from industry sectors such as advanced manufacturing, health care, technology, transportation and construction.

In February, the Work Ready Skills Initiative Advisory Committee handed out $65 million in funds to 25 projects. The money comes from a $100 million bond issue pushed last year by Bevin.

The committee, headed by Hal Heiner, secretary of the Education and Workforce Development Cabinet, chose projects that have $27.2 million in matching funds from local sources.

For example, the Home Builders Association of Northern Kentucky received $2.7 million to work with technical programs in at least six nearby school districts to improve teaching of the building trades.

The winners are:

Gateway Community & Technical College, $95,000; Logan County Schools, $932,000; Russell County Board of Education, $5,700,000; Garrard County Schools, $1,346,000; Freestore Foodbank, $267,000; Estill County Board of Education, $5,700,000; Home Builders Association of Northern Kentucky, $2,690,000; Kenton County Schools, $400,000; Breckinridge County Area Technology Center, $3,325,000; Taylor County School District, $2,375,000; Adair County Board of Education, $238,000; Green River/Hart County and Caverna Schools, $3,325,000; Christian County Public Schools, $4,275,000; Washington County Schools, $763,000; Johnson County Schools, $1,710,000.

“Since this process began in 2016, the committee has reviewed the requests of more than 150 applicants, covering the majority of our counties,” Heiner said. “This program will bear fruit long after it ends, giving students the means to find jobs in a world exploding with technology.”

Linda Blackford: 859-231-1359, @lbblackford

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