Education

Lexington schools have normal day while snow closes other districts

Tina Hill opened her snow-covered back door to load purchases at Meijer in Hamburg on Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2011 in Lexington, Ky.  Lexington coped with a morning snow storm.   Photo by David Perry | Staff
Tina Hill opened her snow-covered back door to load purchases at Meijer in Hamburg on Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2011 in Lexington, Ky. Lexington coped with a morning snow storm. Photo by David Perry | Staff

Wednesday's snowfall led to school closings in much of Kentucky, but Fayette County schools were open and operated on their regular schedule.

School officials, who were criticized Monday for closing schools during a minor snowfall, were criticized this time for keeping schools open.

The heaviest snow fell at morning rush hour then diminished by mid-morning, resulting in 1 to 2 inches of accumulation. Other parts of the state had as much as 6 inches.

Stu Silberman, superintendent of Fayette County Public Schools, said district officials decided about 6 a.m. to hold classes, based on the best weather information available at the time.

According to Silberman, the district usually makes a decision about 5 a.m., but officials waited because conditions were uncertain.

No snow was falling at 5 a.m., although snow was forecast, Silberman said. He said there was no snow at 6, and district officials thought that if snow did start to fall, it would become slush. At that point, they decided to have school, he said.

Some buses experienced minor trouble when road conditions worsened later in the morning, Silberman said. For instance, a bus stalled on a hill in the Beacon Hill area.

All students reached schools safely, he said.

Snow-covered roads caused 56 minor wrecks and five injury accidents early Wednesday, Lexington police spokeswoman Sherelle Roberts said.

Lexington's Division of Streets, Roads and Forestry treated and cleared priority streets. City officials said there was plenty of salt left for the rest of the season. Between 1,000 and 1,200 tons of salt and road treatment remain at the depot on Old Frankfort Pike, and more salt is available from a supplier in Louisville.

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