Laura Clay of Lexington, center, marches with members of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from Madsion, Fayette and Franklin counties at the Democratic National Convention in St. Louis in June 1916. Kentuckians were influential leaders in the quest to get women the right to vote in 1920.
Laura Clay of Lexington, center, marches with members of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from Madsion, Fayette and Franklin counties at the Democratic National Convention in St. Louis in June 1916. Kentuckians were influential leaders in the quest to get women the right to vote in 1920. Laura Clay Collection, Kentucky Digital Library
Laura Clay of Lexington, center, marches with members of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from Madsion, Fayette and Franklin counties at the Democratic National Convention in St. Louis in June 1916. Kentuckians were influential leaders in the quest to get women the right to vote in 1920. Laura Clay Collection, Kentucky Digital Library

Statues honoring Kentucky women are in the works. How the #MeToo movement has helped.

August 21, 2018 02:30 PM

About Tom Eblen

Tom Eblen

@tomeblen

Tom Eblen is a columnist for the Lexington Herald-Leader who writes about life, people and issues in Lexington and Kentucky. A Lexington native, Eblen was the Herald-Leader's managing editor from 1998 to 2008.