Rev. L.H. McIntyre, retired pastor of First African Baptist Church, tells attendees at a reception Feb. 25 launching the First African Foundation about the history of the church, which traces its roots back to about 1790. The foundation hopes to buy the church's former building at the corner of Short and Deweese streets and turn it into a museum and cultural center. The building, finished in 1856, was mostly financed and built by slaves. At the time, it was Kentucky's largest church congregation, black or white.
Rev. L.H. McIntyre, retired pastor of First African Baptist Church, tells attendees at a reception Feb. 25 launching the First African Foundation about the history of the church, which traces its roots back to about 1790. The foundation hopes to buy the church's former building at the corner of Short and Deweese streets and turn it into a museum and cultural center. The building, finished in 1856, was mostly financed and built by slaves. At the time, it was Kentucky's largest church congregation, black or white. Herald-Leader
Rev. L.H. McIntyre, retired pastor of First African Baptist Church, tells attendees at a reception Feb. 25 launching the First African Foundation about the history of the church, which traces its roots back to about 1790. The foundation hopes to buy the church's former building at the corner of Short and Deweese streets and turn it into a museum and cultural center. The building, finished in 1856, was mostly financed and built by slaves. At the time, it was Kentucky's largest church congregation, black or white. Herald-Leader