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Bourbon storage facility collapse at Kentucky distillery will not affect production, company says

Drone footage: Bourbon barrel storage facility collapse

A large portion of a bourbon barrel storage facility at Barton 1792 Distillery in Bardstown collapsed on June 22, 2018.
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A large portion of a bourbon barrel storage facility at Barton 1792 Distillery in Bardstown collapsed on June 22, 2018.

The collapse of a bourbon storage facility at a Bardstown distillery won’t affect production, according to the company.

The Barton 1792 Distillery had started its routine summer shutdown last week, according to company spokeswoman Amy Preske.

It’s common for bourbon distilleries to shut town for a period in the summer for repairs and maintenance.

The collapse of the facility won’t affect production at the distillery when the shutdown ends, Preske said.

Preske said the collapse also will not affect tours at the distillery. Officials expected to open for tours on Saturday and the distillery will resume normal operations Monday, Preske said.

One side of Warehouse 30, which was built in the 1940s, collapsed Friday morning. The facility, called a rickhouse, is where bourbon and other products are stored for aging.

No one was hurt in the collapse.

There was a total of about 18,000 barrels of various products in the rickhouse. The company believes no more than half were affected by the collapse, Preske said.

The company was assessing how many barrels can be recovered. It wasn’t clear yet which Barton 1792 brands or customers will be affected, Preske said in a statement late Friday.

Barton 1792 Distillery is owned by Sazerac, the parent company of Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort. Barton Brands of Kentucky has facilities in Bardstown, Baltimore, Md., and Carson, Calif. The Barton 1792 Distillery was established in 1879 and is the oldest fully-operating distillery in Bardstown, according to the company.

Besides the distillery, there are 28 warehouses and 22 other buildings on the 196-acre property, which makes and ages several award-winning small batch bourbons. It is named for the year that Kentucky became a state.

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