State

Lexington returning to normal after massive snowstorm

Fayette County Public Schools employee Shaun Powers cleared sidewalks Sunday outside Edythe J. Hayes Middle School in Lexington.
Fayette County Public Schools employee Shaun Powers cleared sidewalks Sunday outside Edythe J. Hayes Middle School in Lexington. Herald-Leader

Things will be nearly back to normal Monday in Lexington as students head back to school after a snowstorm canceled classes and rendered some roads almost impassable.

The University of Kentucky will be operating on a normal schedule, while Fayette County Public Schools will operate on a two-hour delay.

Fayette County school buses will run on regular routes, but pick-up times will be two hours later than usual, according to a Facebook post Sunday night by Fayette County Public Schools. Dismissal times will remain the same.

Students in Fayette County had class only on Tuesday last week; they were out first for the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday and then for three snow days.

Traffic accidents were back down to usual numbers Sunday, and there were very few stranded motorists, Lexington police Lt. Joe Anderson said. Since the beginning of the snow Wednesday and through Saturday, Lexington police responded to more than 100 traffic accidents and assisted more than 70 stranded drivers.

Fayette County school buses will run on regular routes, but pick-up times will be two hours later than usual. Dismissal times will remain the same.

Blue Grass Airport spokeswoman Amy Caudill said flights were largely back to normal Sunday, with only two or three cancellations. The canceled flights were headed to the Northeast, where blizzard conditions Saturday dumped more than 22 inches in Washington, D.C., and New York.

Caudill said the majority of Monday’s flights were expected to operate as usual, except a morning flight to Washington that might be canceled.

The Kentucky Utilities outage map showed no customers without power Sunday.

Earlier Sunday there were 16 without power due to the storm, spokesman Cliff Feltham said. Outages were minimal and mostly in areas where ice preceded the snow, he said.

“Most of them were in south-central and southeastern parts of the state,” Feltham said. “The numbers went up and down over the course of the storm, but they were always less than 1,000 at any one time.”

Southeastern Kentucky bore the brunt of snowfall accumulations over the weekend, according to the National Weather Service in Jackson. Lawson in Breathitt County received 20 inches, with Jackson not far behind at 18.5.

The biggest problem from the snow was a massive blockage on Interstate 75 in Rockcastle and Laurel counties that left numerous motorists stranded Friday night. State police in London said Sunday that I-75 was back to normal and running smoothly.

In some southern parts of the state, the fallout was still being felt. Boats and docks at marinas on Lake Cumberland and elsewhere in Kentucky sustained damage, some of it significant, over the weekend because the accumulation of ice and heavy snow caused covered slips to collapse.

Lee’s Ford Marina, Burnside Marina, Beaver Creek Marina and Jamestown Marina, all on Lake Cumberland, announced severe damage in statements released Sunday.

Green River Marina on Green River Lake also said Saturday on Facebook that docks had sustained heavy damage.

Statements from all of the marinas asked boat owners to refrain from checking on their watercraft. Roads leading to the marinas were covered in snow, and the docks were unstable and unsafe, according to the statements.

Boat owner Kelli Quinton Edwards said some of the docks at Lee’s Ford Marina were significantly damaged while others had little to no damage.

“The boat owners at Lee’s Ford are a tight-knit community,” Edwards said. “We have been fortunate to make many new friends down there, and unfortunately many of them have major damage to their boats, and that breaks our heart. We have seen the hard work they have put into their boats and all the joy it gives them and their families.”

Edwards said her family’s boat did not appear to be damaged, and they were praying for the best.

“For many of us, that is our home away from home in the summer,” Edwards said. “It is just heartbreaking.”

Linda Blackford: 859-231-1359, @lbblackford

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