State

Blue Grass Trust honors 21c Museum Hotel

Long lines outside the door during the grand opening of the 21C hotel on Monday February 29, 2016, in Lexington.
Long lines outside the door during the grand opening of the 21C hotel on Monday February 29, 2016, in Lexington. mcornelison@herald-leader.com

The Blue Grass Trust on Sunday honored Kentuckians who have worked to preserve homes, office buildings and pieces of the state’s past, including the couple behind the 21c Museum Hotel.

Laura Lee Brown and Steve Wilson, founders of 21c, were honored with the John Wesley Hunt Award for a lifetime of service to the preservation movement in Central Kentucky. Under the direction of Wilson and Brown, the historic First National Building on Main Street was converted from offices into a boutique hotel, restaurant and bar and art museum with event space that opened in late February.

Other winners were:

▪  Dave Bremer, Lexington woodworker, Preservation Craftsman Award, given to a building industry craftsman who has exhibited a strong commitment to quality craftsmanship for historic buildings. His projects have included the Old Governor’s Mansion in Frankfort and the Pope Villa in Lexington, among many others.

▪  The Kentucky Heritage Council, Public Service to Preservation Award, given to a government agency or official for service to the preservation movement or to a specific project. The council was honored for work preserving everything from Appalachian coal camps and African-American hamlets to Main Streets and courthouse squares across the state.

▪  Stephen McBride of Camp Nelson, Clay Lancaster Heritage Education Award, given for service in researching and disseminating information about the Central Kentucky region. As director of Interpretation and Archaeology at the Camp Nelson Civil War Heritage Park in Jessamine County, McBride has worked to preserve and tell Camp Nelson’s story as a Union supply depot and hospital and one of the nation’s largest Civil War U.S. Colored Troop recruiting and training centers and African-American refugee camps.

▪  The Buckner-Hinkle family for Buknore in Paris; Brooks and Holly Scudder for 445 West Second Street; and Andrew and Joy Moore for 407 South Mill Street, Community Preservation Awards, given for a special preservation project. The descendants of Walker Buckner in 2015 completed a renovation of a beautiful antebellum mansion in Bourbon County. The Scudders rescued a long-abandoned property that the city wrested from an absentee landlord. The Moores bought a house next to their own on South Mill and successfully connected them, creating one home.

▪  Kathryn Glenn McKinley and Kitty Sautter for Floral Hall of Lexington, the Barbara Hulette Award for efforts in preserving Central Kentucky’s history, heritage, built environment, landscape, archaeological resources, sense of community or significant endeavors. McKinley and Sautter have worked to preserve and continue the use of the octagonal building near the Red Mile, restored its cupola and three-story chandelier.

▪  Kathy Chopra, the Lucy Shropshire Crump Volunteer Award, given for exemplary service to the Blue Grass Trust throughout the year.

▪  Dale Holland, the Lucy Graves Advocacy Award, given for advocacy leadership in supporting the historic preservation movement in Central Kentucky.

▪  Bonnie and Jim Tanner, the Betty Hoopes Volunteer Service Award, given to a volunteer or volunteers from the Antique and Garden Show Committee.

▪  Zeff Maloney, for 333 West Short Street, the Clyde Carpenter Adaptive Re-use Award, for outstanding efforts toward the rehabilitation and adaptive re-use of a building or buildings in Central Kentucky. Originally a hospital, then a coffee and peanut roastery and an office furniture warehouse, the building has been renovated by Maloney into hip offices.

▪  Richard and Debbie Weber for the Barn at Springhouse Gardens in Nicholasville, the Landscape Preservation Award, for preservation, design, stewardship, restoration or enhancement of an historic cultural landscape in the Bluegrass. The Webers repurposed an old tobacco barn into a beautiful venue space.

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