Editorials

City's unique flavor

Bob Slone, who celebrated 50 years in the grocery business in June, is closing his last Lexington store.
Bob Slone, who celebrated 50 years in the grocery business in June, is closing his last Lexington store.

Last week's news that Bob Slone was closing his last Lexington grocery store was a disappointment not only to those who watched for its sales on beef tenderloins but also to those who root for the little guys who hang on, against huge odds.

Slone's joins Eastland True Value Hardware and the venerable Dawahare's chain among those that have fallen to the seeming inevitability of the big-box chains that have come to dominate the landscape.

Slone's lives to fight another day in the four Eastern Kentucky towns where it faces far less competition than it does in Lexington.

And fortunately, Lexington still retains many of its iconic, locally owned independents, such as Fayette Seed, Louie's Flower Power Shops, Spalding's Bakery, Critchfield Meats, Joe Bologna's and others.

Their numbers may be dwindling, but they help Lexington retain its own particular flavor ... like the flavor of those Spalding's doughnuts, Critchfield's steaks and Joe Bologna's pizza.

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