Letters to the Editor

Switch schools and prisons

Students at a middle school in Albany, N.Y. have their bags checked and pass through metal detectors on the first day of school in 2016.
Students at a middle school in Albany, N.Y. have their bags checked and pass through metal detectors on the first day of school in 2016. Associated Press

There may be a potential compromise to the current discussion of school safety, which has the added benefit of addressing another issue of concern. Put students in prison and prisoners in schools. Many students think schools are prisons already and may not notice the difference. The prisoners will, at best, have improved chances of recidivism, or at worst, will be bored into a stupor, making them less likely to carry out further criminal acts.

Additionally, since it is considerably more expensive to incarcerate a prisoner, there will be more resources for the students in prison. It will also address demographic concerns by reallocating physical facilities for an increasing prison population and decreasing student population.

Both teachers and prison guards, who are used to low pay and sometimes challenging working conditions, should not complain — for them, it’s a wash. This also would satisfy advocates of year-round schools and charter schools and perhaps some other benefits as well. Win-win.

Charles Myers

Lexington

  Comments