Letters to the Editor

Letters on Bevin’s criticism of teachers

Teachers and other supporters at M.A. Cassidy Elementary in Lexington athered before school Thursday morning to participate in a county-wide walk-in designed to make legislators aware of their concerns around pension reform and the proposed state budget.
Teachers and other supporters at M.A. Cassidy Elementary in Lexington athered before school Thursday morning to participate in a county-wide walk-in designed to make legislators aware of their concerns around pension reform and the proposed state budget. cbertram@herald-leader.com

Bevin throwing stones at teachers

For Gov. Matt Bevin to equate teachers with greedy WWII hoarders is not only despicable and insulting, it is unconscionable, considering he is the millionaire whose ethics were questioned when he paid $1.6 million for a mansion valued at $3 million by Jefferson County.

Once more the teaching profession is being demeaned and denigrated by men who know nothing about teachers and their dedication to the task of providing the best possible education to the young people they serve. No other profession is subject to so much criticism, scrutiny and interference.

No other professionals are expected to keep pursuing more college hours, more degrees and more training. No other professionals have to answer to so many groups at so many levels: parents, administrators, local officials, state officials and the federal government.

No other professionals would be expected to pay for the pilfering of their retirement fund by contributing more money to the fund, working longer and receiving fewer benefits.

By calling professionals “selfish” and “ignorant,” the governor is living in a glass mansion and throwing stones at teachers, who are often the unpaid social workers who find ways to help children who lack warm coats, school supplies and a little tenderness.

Shirley Baechtold

Richmond

Demand for loyalty off base

So our governor has branded teachers disloyal, selfish and ignorant. I am accustomed to politicians tossing around words like selfish and ignorant, but disloyal? I am not sure exactly what aspect of loyalty he was thinking about. And disloyal to whom?

Consulting my trusty dictionary, I find synonyms for loyalty to include obedience, homage and devotion. Now I am wondering just which one of these traits he finds lacking in teachers. And my next question: How can any elected public servant mindful of his own obligation to serve, demand obedience, homage or devotion from constituents?

Judy Johnson

Lexington

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