Letters to the Editor

Put school safety over feelings

Zach Sippy, a senior at Henry Clay, was critical of the school’s handling of a incident in which a student had a gun on campus.
Zach Sippy, a senior at Henry Clay, was critical of the school’s handling of a incident in which a student had a gun on campus.

Student Zachariah Sippy penned a well-written column concerning the alarming incident at Henry Clay High School. Is his topic school safety or students’ feelings? It appears the latter.

He begins by criticizing the school administration for tardiness in alerting the school community of the dangerous situation. He correctly allows that overwrought rumors contributed to a somewhat chaotic situation, in which only a few students felt safe.

Sippy then decries the school system’s communication policies and demanding reform. He goes on to say that superficial security measures will not solve the problem. What problem? Defending school kids’ lives or their feelings? Superficial measures will do neither.

Furthermore, according to Sippy, “militarizing” the campus by adding more security officers and metal detectors will do nothing to make the students feel any better and would only inhibit their free movement through the school.

His solution: “Place new emphasis on school climate and the emotional well being of our students.” Each of the actions Sippy suggests may very well contribute to school children feeling safer and more secure. Not one will actually make them so.

The students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida almost certainly felt safe and secure as they went to school on Feb. 14. Their feelings did not protect them.

Joe R. B. Hacker

Lexington

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