Letters to the Editor

‘No-feed’ for feral cats

A trapped kitten tried to look menacing in its cage at a spay/neuter clinic for feral cats in 2012 in Georgetown.
A trapped kitten tried to look menacing in its cage at a spay/neuter clinic for feral cats in 2012 in Georgetown.

This is an unpopular opinion but needs to be heard. Feeding feral cats and trap-neuter-release programs (TNR) constitute cruelty in the long run. TNR is actually TNA (trap-neuter-abandon). Cats released by such programs get no subsequent treatment for illnesses. They can be hit by cars, attacked by dogs or coyotes, poisoned or subjected to human cruelty.

Feral cats present risks to humans, pets and wildlife. Often people who feed ferals are cruelly inconsistent, inadvertently attract more cats and bring in rats because of the food left outside.

Lexington-Fayette County needs a no-feed ordinance. The “if you feed it, you own it” programs do not work. With a no-feed ordinance, feral cat colonies will shrink significantly.

I might add that I have worked for veterinarians and did rescue work for 12 years. I have witnessed the suffering of these animals.

Betsy Packard

Lexington

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