Letters to the Editor

CIA’s Haspel tied to torture

Central Intelligence Agency director Gina Haspel stood for the national anthem during her swearing-in ceremony on May 21.
Central Intelligence Agency director Gina Haspel stood for the national anthem during her swearing-in ceremony on May 21. Associated Press

A retired air force officer recently argued that new CIA chief Gina Haspel acted “legally” with her prisoner interrogation techniques and that no one should question their morality.

The United States is a signatory of the United Nations Convention Against Torture, which requires us to abstain from torture and prosecute those who do it.

Yes, waterboarding has been defined as torture for centuries. But the Bush administration did far more than waterboarding, with hundreds of prisoners dying in our custody. In his book “Our Endangered Values,” former President Jimmy Carter told about an Iraqi general voluntarily turning himself in to the United States in an attempt to locate his sons. He was tortured, stuffed in a bag and died from trauma and suffocation.

Haspel not only presided over torture, but prepared a cable ordering the destruction of videotapes the CIA inspector general reported showed “cruel, inhumane and degrading treatment.”

Rita Swan

Lexington

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