Letters to the Editor

Wrong person at top of Beshear ticket, and other thoughts

As Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear looks over her shoulder, Jacqueline Coleman speaks to a gathering of supporters following the announcement of her candidacy for Lt. Governor at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage in Louisville, Ky, Monday, July 9, 2018. TIMOTHY D. EASLEY
As Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear looks over her shoulder, Jacqueline Coleman speaks to a gathering of supporters following the announcement of her candidacy for Lt. Governor at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage in Louisville, Ky, Monday, July 9, 2018. TIMOTHY D. EASLEY

One Beshear enough

I wonder if Kentucky is ready for another Beshear for governor. Steve Beshear, the father of gubernatorial candidate Attorney General Andy Beshear, had eight years as governor and did nothing to fix the teachers’ and government retirement programs. The Herald-Leader covered corruption, embezzlement and bribery during the father’s term as governor.

Gov. Matt Bevin has at least been trying to fix the problem, but fails to get backing. Andy Beshear has been putting up road blocks to work toward a solution to make himself politically attractive and lay the groundwork for his run for governor.

I see Beshear as nothing but a political hack. I haven’t read or heard anything about how Beshear will solve the retirement problem yet, except for negative comments about Bevin’s plan.

After reading the Herald-Leader, I would say that Jacqueline Coleman should be the Democratic candidate for governor instead of being a patsy for Beshear as his running mate. After reading her resume and her experience, I believe if she would run for governor on her own, she would have my vote. She reminds me of former Kentucky Gov. Martha Layne Collins, who promoted jobs and made a giant step to improve Kentucky’s educational system.

Edwin B. Swan, Somerset

Support foreign aid

With the debate going on all over the country about a wall to be built on the border, many people are outraged over how the United States is choosing to spend taxpayers’ money in regards to international affairs. There is a huge controversy over whether the United States need to spend more money to help countries around the world, or whether our country already spends too much. Whether or not you agree that a wall should be put on the southern border, let’s look at the facts about the current international affairs budget.

It’s tiny. The international affairs budget accounts for less than 1 percent of the federal budget. A Kaiser Family Foundation poll published in 2015 asked respondents: “What percentage of the federal budget is spent on foreign aid?” — the average response was 28 percent.

Foreign aid not only benefits these other countries but it is vital for the United States as well. As poverty rates are dropping globally, its creating new consumers of U.S. goods and products. Most importantly, it is in the interest of our national security to help these countries in need.

Elizabeth Tramontin, Borgen Project intern, Frankfort

Expand concealed carry

State Rep. Robert Goforth’s House Bill 30 would expand the state’s recognition of the concealed carry of deadly weapons (CCDW) by Kentuckians with standard carry permits. After passage of the bill, the number of locations standard permit holders would need to avoid would be whittled down to federally prohibited property, jails, courtrooms and police/sheriff’s offices.

Constitutionally, there are no public locations (day cares, schools, universities, bars, etc.) in Kentucky where the state legislature may infringe (or empower another entity to infringe) upon the bearing of arms openly; the legislature’s only authority concerns the concealed carry of weapons as Section 1, Article 7 of the Kentucky Constitution’s Bill of Rights makes crystal clear.

Goforth, an East Bernstadt Republican, has put forth common-sense legislation built upon the civil rights principle that a right not exercised is a right lost. His bill would extend to all law-abiding Kentucky CCDW permit holders expanded abilities to legally protect themselves and their families as previously only afforded to the “special” people. Urge all legislators to support this bill.

Gary S. Morris, Berea

Who’s telling the truth?

President Donald J. Trump (aka Humpty Dumpty Trumpty) says the southern border wall will keep murderers, rapists and drug dealers out of the United States. El Chapo is reported as saying people will go under, over and around the wall to get into the United States.

The Washington Post research indicates that Trump told 5,600 untruths in 2018. To the best of my knowledge, El Chapo has not lied to us. Who are you going to believe?

John C. Wolff, Jr., Lexington

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