Letters to the Editor

Letters to editor: Rowan County clerk controversy

Law is supposed to protect religious liberty

It appears few officials in Kentucky executive, judicial or legislative branches read the opinion of the Supreme Court in its entirety.

While it does legalize same-sex marriage, it also includes language to protect religious freedom and an individual's right of conscience.

Specifically, it states: "Finally, it must be emphasized that religions, and those who adhere to religious doctrines, may continue to advocate with utmost, sincere conviction that, by divine precepts, same-sex marriage should not be condoned. The First Amendment ensures that religious organizations and persons are given proper protection as they seek to teach the principles that are so fulfilling and so central to their lives and faiths, and to their own deep aspirations to continue the family structure they have long revered."

Neither Gov. Steve Beshear nor Attorney General Jack Conway has indicated they have any intention of enforcing that portion of the law of the land.

Shortly after taking office in January, Rowan County clerk Kim Davis tried to take pre-emptive measures to avoid the current predicament.

Anticipating the court would rule to legalize same-sex marriage, she contacted legislators to request legislation to protect clerks' rights of conscience. Unfortunately, only one legislator responded and no legislation was enacted.

Betty Crawford

Louisville


Unfair double standard

Is anyone listening to the double standard when it comes to talking about the county clerk who refuses to issue same sex marriage licenses? Do they remember Jack Conway, who is running for governor but refused to appeal the ruling against Kentucky's ban on gay marriage?

Do they remember that President Barack Obama refused to enforce the Defense of Marriage Act?

They took an oath to uphold the law, too.

People say that government officials should enforce the current law. Do their job or resign. Well, shouldn't the same argument apply to Conway and Obama?

That's the same thing Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis is saying, except she said it was against her religious beliefs. Maybe that's why people are so hard on her.

Heaven help us if we have government officials with strong religious beliefs. Maybe that's what we need more of in our country. We wouldn't be in the shape we're in.

Gregory A. Doss

Lexington


Conway, justices wrong

Kentucky had a vote on what marriage was — between a man and a woman was the outcome.

Jack Conway was elected the attorney general and was supposed to uphold the vote of Kentucky — despite the ruling against it — but he would not do this, so the governor had to hire lawyers to do his job.

He could not do his job as attorney general, how can he be a governor?

We all know the outcome of the liberal court on this.

From what I understand, two of the liberal judges had already performed gay marriages before the vote on this important matter. They should not have voted on this, which would have given Kentucky a reason for an appeal.

A. Michael Thornton, DMD

Paris


Beshear hurt state image

Gov. Steve Beshear is a continued disappointment to not only the state of Kentucky but also to the entire United States.

His approval of hundreds of thousands of dollars to defend a law that his attorney general wouldn't defend because he knew it was unconstitutional is now only overshadowed by his refusal to spend any money to defend the rights of citizens of your state.

Thank you for helping to make Kentucky a national punchline.

I've seen many governors of this state and I'll see many more, but I know at this moment I've seen the most ineffectual and inadequate governor to date.

Beshear's unwillingness and inability to do his job is very much like a few other elected officials in this state who are drawing salaries for doing nothing.

He can get back to worrying about getting gambling in the state to line his pockets.

Martin Moore

London


Davis' marriage history

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis said in regard to efforts to force her to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, "I never imagined a day like this would come, where I would be asked to violate a central teaching of Scripture and of Jesus himself regarding marriage."

Really? How about the day she divorced her first husband and married her second? Or the day she divorced her second husband and married her third? Or the day she divorced her third?

Jesus never said anything about homosexuality or same-sex marriage, but he did talk about the sin of divorce, and he spoke repeatedly about the sin of judging others. I don't think Davis or her supporters are as Christian as they claim to be.

Greg Kring

Lexington


It's religion that will suffer

The really pernicious thing about the refusal on grounds of religion to issue marriage licenses to gays is not what it's doing to gays — it can't turn back the tide of history — but what it's doing to religion.

The world is watching as people loudly proclaiming their Christian convictions act in ways that seem directly counter to the teachings and practices of Christ, who ate with outcasts and condemned the self-righteous Pharisees.

The term "Christian" has been co-opted by people who don't seem to remember that Christ told them to love — and not to judge — their brothers and sisters.

My fear is that they may be courting what they will call martyrdom as a groundwork for commercial or political activities. My hope is that I am wrong.

But in all cases sincere, devout Kentuckians should bear in mind Jesus' statement that not everyone who calls out "Lord, Lord" is actually following him.

Lela Stromenger

Lexington


Justice wisely served

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis is not being persecuted for her religious beliefs. She has been prosecuted for breaking the laws by which a civil society lives and functions.

Justice has been served. U.S. Judge David Bunning made a wise and, more importantly, effective decision. Now both government and society can hopefully return to normal in Rowan County and Kentucky.

Charles Edward Pogue

Georgetown


Muslim religious liberty?

What if Kim Davis, Rowan County clerk, was a Muslim and would not provide services to women who don't wear burqas? Would her current supporters scream that she is applying Sharia law, and that is against the U.S. Constitution?

Ralph Blumer

Lexington


Good time for Bible study

Now that Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis has been sent to jail for violating her constitutional oath, she may want to ponder upon three scripture verses in her Bible.

In doing so, perhaps she will see the obvious answer to her dilemma: Step down and forego her $80,000 salary taxpayers are paying her.

Matthew 6:24: "No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and money."

John 8:7: "... and as they continued to ask Him, He stood up and said to them, Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her."

Matthew 7:1-5: "Do not judge, or you too will be judged. For, in the same way you judge others, you will be judged, and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you. Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother's eye and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye?"

Diana Nave

Lexington

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