Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor: August 4

Four-wheelers, public roads a fatal mix

Over a recent four-week period, Eastern Kentucky saw four fatalities on dirt bikes and four-wheelers — two in Owsley, one in Knox and one in Whitley counties.

All four of these, and countless others, have one thing in common. They were killed on public highways.

These deaths were preventable. If the parents of the children who were killed had kept them off the roads, and the adults had done so also, all these folks would have been alive today.

I drive all over Eastern Kentucky in my job and have to avoid four-wheelers every day. I'm not talking about on one-lane county roads, either. I had to miss two of them on the Hal Rogers Parkway in one week. They were riding beside me, and I was running over 60 mph.

It's time for law enforcement to take calls about four-wheelers and off-road motorcycles seriously. As I wrote this, four of them were drag-racing on the road outside my window. I've called the sheriff repeatedly about it, but have never once gained a response and no longer expect one.

It's a safety hazard, a public nuisance and, last I checked, unlawful. Keep your kids off the roads with ATVs and set a safe example for them yourself.

Gavin Wilson

London

Hard-line prisons

In response to the article about a Kentucky prison restricting pastoral visits to Death Row inmates, the Department of Correction's hard-line policy apparently also applies to inmates newly relocated to Western Kentucky Correctional Complex.

Following the aftermath of the sex scandal at the Otter Creek facility in Eastern Kentucky, officials determined the best thing to do was to shuffle state prisoners around to minimize the fallout.

The commonwealth has spent well in excess of a half-million dollars to rehab the former men's prison in Western Kentucky to house new female inmates. Add in the cost of transportation, and you have a sizeable bill on the backs of the taxpayers.

The pressure then becomes the need to transfer female inmates as quickly as possible from the one Louisville facility to the Western Kentucky facility. My 19-year-old-daughter was abruptly taken out of the shower, told to pack and was taken at 5 a.m. to Western Correctional. No matter that she had an algebra test that day or that she was awaiting the results of a second interview for the Paws for Purpose program.

And when I traveled 400 miles to see her, I was turned away for arriving eight minutes late. Never mind that I had never been to that part of the state; I should've been there earlier.

These are the values that this commonwealth practices. These are the values its citizens enjoy.

Deena Sharp

Union

That's enough now

Why do so many TV reporters start their briefings with the word "now?"

Sometimes "now" is used to start more than one sentence during a briefing. That is as bad as "uh" or "you know."

"Now" is irrelevant and sounds dumb. I hope that I hear fewer in the future. I will feel great if I never hear another "now" at the beginning or during a briefing unless used properly.

Polly Jo Green

Frankfort

Charity for whom?

On the Kentucky attorney general's Web site one can find a list of all registered charities in Kentucky. Looking closer, one might ask: Since when is the Center for Rural Development a charity? I said that correctly.

The Center for Rural Development is a charity with $4 million in expenses and more than $6.7 million in revenue.

If this is a charity, how many children does it feed? Perhaps, a better question would be how many politicians are making a fast buck.

If one searches one will also find that another charity has been operating out of this same building and that is the I-66 charity. Yep, you read that correctly.

There is a charity for promoting Interstate 66 which has operated inside this "charity" building with free utilities, etc., for a number of years.

Wonder how many children it feeds?

Curtis Gilliland

Somerset

Protecting Israel

Regardless of your feelings about the crisis between Israel and the Palestinians and their Arab neighbors, even if you believe there is more culpability on Israel's part, the following two sentences say it all:

If the Arab Muslims put down their weapons, there would be no more violence.

If the Jews put down their weapons, there would be no more Israel.

Carl Ross

Lexington

Be afraid

In a July 4 article about the purchase of Lexington Mall by Southland Christian Church, Southland's pastor, Jon Weece, is quoted saying: "As scary as this is, God did not call us to live by fear. God called us to live by faith."

I really am not quite sure how Weece, with all his biblical training, could state something so erroneous.

So I ponder why he is blinded to the truth. I would think Weece would have some sort of accountability for what he says considering what the Bible preaches.

From my learning and from messages I have heard from Christians all my life, the idea of fear is indeed what the Bible teaches. Without fear, God has no influence.

There are countless scriptures that talk about fearing God. One such is Luke 12:5: "But I will show you whom to fear; fear him who, after the killing of the body, has power to throw you into hell. Yes, I tell you, fear him." Studying the Bible, I see fear as a common thread. The Old Testament, especially Jeremiah, is all about fear.

Unfortunately, this did not render man into moral compliance. Today we see the same displays of sin as were written about thousands of years ago.

The writings of the Bible call man to fear god.

Barry Young

Lexington

Image concerns

According to the Herald-Leader, a man "allegedly shot his son during an argument" in Rowdy, Ky. And some are worried about image damage caused by a "hillbillies don't play golf" comment?

John C. Wolff, Jr.

Lexington

Liberal newspaper

I have never seen a newspaper so liberal as yours.

You have tried so hard to put Rand Paul down. It is so obvious what you are doing.

Paul is for the hardworking people. Why you don't understand that is beyond my belief.

I can understand why your newspaper is in trouble. You do not represent the majority of the people in Kentucky.

Mary Jones

Berea

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