Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor: Nov. 25

Use holiday to appreciate nation and our families

Thanksgiving is about our American heritage, family values and taking time to reflect and thank God for this country we live in. If one doesn't believe in God, surely he or she can take a day to spend with family and celebrate the freedom we have in America.

If you don't have family, there are homeless shelters, children's homes, nursing homes or friends like you who don't have someone close to be with.

I was sickened and saddened to learn some stores will be open on Thanksgiving Day — just to rake in the almighty dollar at the expense of their employees, our family values and our heritage.

A mountain crumbles and falls to nothing slowly — one rock, one boulder at a time. Why can't people understand that our great nation is crumbling slowly, one greedy, self-centered rock at a time?

Margie Riggs

Lexington

Obama's tepid recovery

The National Bureau of Economic Research, the official recession scorekeeper, said the downturn that began in December 2007 ended way back in June 2009. You'd think the news that the Great Recession is officially over would be something to cheer about. Try telling that to almost 10 percent of Americans who can not find meaningful employment. Anyone feel like celebrating?

President Barack Obama has often claimed that the $800-plus billion stimulus package helped prevent the recession from becoming another Great Depression. The trouble is that we now know the recession ended just as the stimulus money started to get spent.

According to the White House's own report, only $45.6 billion in spending and tax relief had gone out the door. In other words, less than 6 percent of the stimulus money was in the economy as the recession ended. This makes it harder for Obama to blame President George W. Bush for the nation's current economic troubles.

Obama rightly notes that he was handed a terrible economy — not by Bush, but by a Democratic-controlled Congress that believed everyone had the right to own a home, whether they could afford it or not. They put pressure on financial institutions to make millions of unsecured loans, then chastised them for doing what they were forced to do.

Now we learn the recession was five months away from being over when Obama took office. So while Obama doesn't own the recession, he certainly owns the recovery, which has no real end in sight.

Cecil Davis

Lexington

Spoils of war

I was watching a TV news report of U.S. troops pulling out of Iraq. One young soldier was yelling, "We won." I wanted to strangle him.

What have we won? Nothing. Hundreds of brave American soldiers have given their lives for nothing. All those drives and ambitions for the future washed away in their own blood.

The insurgents are still there, waiting to crawl back out of the woodwork. Nothing has changed except that too many American families and now without sons and daughters, husbands and wives. So I ask again, what have we won?

Vivienne Skidmore

Lexington

Laissez-faire politics

Our newly elected anti-government Sen. Rand Paul believes our country can solve its economic problems by allowing the business sector free rein, free of government interference or regulation.

Does Paul really believe that business will govern itself to always do what's right or just?

We, the people, are the government and government is not the villain Paul makes it out to be. His scales of justice are overwhelmingly tilted in favor of the wealthy who will own him.

Kentucky and America now have another "just say no" senator who represents rich special interests at the expense of a middle class and poor majority.

Business creates lots of jobs, and for that we can be thankful. But businesses cannot operate without those workers and won't last long if buyers aren't there to consume their goods and services.

American corporations sent millions of manufacturing jobs overseas.

Our high unemployment rate would be much lower if the jobs were still here.

Paul's laissez-faire philosophy, which promotes greed and selfishness, is bad policy and inconsistent with the "In God We Trust" that graces our currency.

What could unite America is everyone working for the common good — government, business, churches, schools.

I voted for Jack Conway because I believed his scales of justice were much more evenly balanced than Paul's.

Senator-elect Paul ran against President Barack Obama, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

Now the pressure is on Paul and the Republican Party to create jobs and rescue a broken economy Republicans helped create.

Paul L. Whiteley Sr.

Louisville

Cruelty to animal

If I were to shoot a dog six times while on someone's property, I would be arrested on animal cruelty charges.

A Lexington cop did the same thing in September and he, according to police, acted appropriately?

Cop with short fuse and huge ego gets off scot free. Sickening.

Jack Taylor

Lexington

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