Letters to the Editor

Letters to editor: May 31

Dennis Earlenbaugh color illustration of gas-pump nozzle vacuuming dollar bills - with increasingly nervous George Washington - from wallet. Akron Beacon Journal 2006

gas prices, pumping, vacuum, fuel, pump, wallet, inflation, dollar, bills, dollars, high, cost, debt, krtenergy, energy, national, auto, automobile, car, business, krtnamer, north, america, krtpersonalfinance, personal finance, krtusbusiness, u.s., us, united, states, krtedonly, illustration, ilustracion, grabado, gasolina, dinero, coste, energia, cartera, billetera, petrol, surtidor, gas, price, gasoline, krtauto, krtnational, krtbusiness, ak, contributed, coddington, earlenbaugh, 2006,  krt2006, mct2006 mct
Dennis Earlenbaugh color illustration of gas-pump nozzle vacuuming dollar bills - with increasingly nervous George Washington - from wallet. Akron Beacon Journal 2006 gas prices, pumping, vacuum, fuel, pump, wallet, inflation, dollar, bills, dollars, high, cost, debt, krtenergy, energy, national, auto, automobile, car, business, krtnamer, north, america, krtpersonalfinance, personal finance, krtusbusiness, u.s., us, united, states, krtedonly, illustration, ilustracion, grabado, gasolina, dinero, coste, energia, cartera, billetera, petrol, surtidor, gas, price, gasoline, krtauto, krtnational, krtbusiness, ak, contributed, coddington, earlenbaugh, 2006, krt2006, mct2006 mct MCT

Early warning to July 4 parade participants

Every year in mid-July, the opinion page gets bombarded with letters about how terrible and unpatriotic the Fourth of July parade was. I wanted to get this letter into print early to save that from happening this year.

Those who will be in the parade take notice: We don't care what political party you like. We don't want to see your business' float rolling down Main Street.

There will be a lot of children there who should know what Independence Day is supposed to mean. I challenge everyone reading this letter to cut it out and pin it to your calendar on the square for July 4. Then when the day rolls around, it will remind you to take note.

Why do I get a bad feeling that the crowd watching the parade will mutter, "That letter writer was right. The parade dropped the ball again."

Get ready, Herald-Leader. Come July you will undoubtedly receive letters from disappointed parade patrons. Don't say I didn't warn you.

Luke Meighan

Lexington

Flag not about racism

I'm glad the state is going to have a Confederate flag license plate. For the uninformed who think the Civil War was over slavery, read your history. The Southern states left over taxing Southern products and spending the money in the north.

If you read The Emancipation Proclamation, you will find it allows many states and parts of states to keep slaves. Don't blame the flag of rebellion for slavery.

I grew up in South Carolina. I'm proud of the Confederate flag, and it has nothing to do with being racist.

Pete Ayers

London

Bias not Christian

As with a previous letter writer, I also was at the public meeting on May 10, regarding a possible fairness ordinance in Berea, and I was also dismayed at the reporting in the Herald-Leader the following day.

I did feel the editorial on May 17 was very good, but it still left unsaid what I think are some obvious points.

Although there were Christians at the meeting who opposed a fairness ordinance, there were also Christians in favor of it.

Like the conservative Christians, we, too, are active in our churches and committed to our beliefs and interpretations of the Bible. But having said that, I strongly believe this is not a religious issue, but one of equality and justice.

Dorie Hubbard

Berea

Speculation in gas prices

Regarding the March 29 commentary by Robert Rapier of Merica International, "Dispelling a few myths about gas supplies and prices:"

As a 35-year employee of a major refining company with my entire career spent in the purchasing of crude oil — from U.S. fields originally, and then some 15 years in the foreign arena — I submit the intended epistle was completely misguided and missed the primary points on pricing of crude oil.

When I started in the business in 1958, the law of supply and demand determined the crude oil prices in the world marketplace. In the early '80s, the New York Mercantile Exchange placed crude oil in the commodities system, same as corn, wheat, cattle and many others, which in effect was to allow end-users to hedge their prices on materials utilized in their businesses.

Economist Adam Smith's supply and demand theory on price determination went out the window.

The speculators, brokers and paper traders battled each other with many gimmicks and tricks to play the game, several times trading more barrels of crude than was actually being produced.

In summary, the speculators, brokers and traders set the price of crude oil without ever accepting a barrel or taking title to the commodity. These were strictly paper trades and the dollars involved were huge. The oil companies, producers or refiners, had no say in the determination of prices.

A limit should be placed on the volume of crude that speculators and traders can trade in the commodities market.

Don Weller

Ashland

Patience on road repairs

I agree with two previous letter writers about the road conditions in Lexington right now. However, this is a good-sized town. We had a hard winter, and you can't expect everything to be fixed overnight.

It is also nearly impossible to lay blacktop or pour concrete in the rain. How many days have we had lately that city workers could do repairs?

Have a little patience, please. When they do get to lay blacktop, please don't complain that they are snarling up traffic.

I am sure no one in Lexington will gripe about roads that have lanes blocked for repair. Right?

Archie W. Falin

Lexington

Glib politics, little truth

"Truth, like a bird, is ever poised for flight at man's approach," a saying goes. Politicians on Capitol Hill must have inspired that thought.

For example, an increase in oil production in America would return reason to the price of gasoline.

Our politicians have a stock reply to that solution. We only have two percent of the world's oil reserves and we use 25 percent of the world's oil production.

What they do not say is our 2 percent is estimated at 2.3 trillion barrels, about three times more than the reserves held by Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and sufficient to meet 300 years of demand at current levels without importing a single barrel of oil.

When asked about foreign aid, they have another stock reply. It is less than one percent of the budget. They never answer money-related questions in dollars. In 2010, they took $44.9 billion out of household budgets for foreign aid.

Outcomes speak louder than glib words. A few of their achievements include two ongoing, unnecessary wars, rampant unemployment, a $14 trillion debt, a $1.5 trillion deficit, absurd gas prices and illegal aliens who roam our land at will.

And now our politicians advocate "shared sacrifice" as the solution to the hardships caused by their incompetence.

Moreover, they can't even put their ideologies aside long enough to work as a team for the sake of a critically ill America in dire need of truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

Shafter Bailey

Lawrenceburg

Legal misfortune

Several years ago, attorney Bryan Coffman was referred to me by a well-known law office. I and sometimes my husband and daughter met him in his office several times. He was always punctual, courteous and professional.

I am saddened to read about his conviction in a "drilling scam."

Moreover, since his wife, Megan, (whom I have never met) was accused but acquitted in this living nightmare, I want her to know I have compassion for her and will be praying for her and her husband.

It is all about "greed," isn't it?

Barbara A. Cox

Lexington

  Comments