Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor: Nov. 24

Poor attendance for parade feting Veterans Day

Once again, I attended the Veterans Day parade and, once again, not many people lined the street to thank them for their service to our country. It was a fine parade. Sorry so many missed it.

There were men and women from World War II who served to keep America and other countries free in this world. Be grateful you don't have to speak Japanese or German now.

Our troops have fought in Korea, Vietnam and the Middle East. Some came home wounded in body and mind. Some didn't come home alive.

They all sacrificed for us. Show them the respect they deserve. I know that Saturday was busy with the University of Kentucky football game, horse show, etc. But unless you were ill, where were you?

It's a free country, and you can choose not to attend, but you could have brought joy to our heroes' faces and swelled their hearts with pride. It is the right thing to do.

Kentuckians, thank veterans for their service, buy them a cup of coffee, lunch or dinner. Do something for them. They gave a lot for you. Lexington Herald-Leader, please do a better job of promoting the Veteran's Day parade in the future. I kept looking for information before the parade. Did I miss it?

I finally found a few lines in the Weekender on page 3 on Nov. 4. There was also a photo of the 2007 parade.

Marilyn Cain

Lexington


Fan speaks out

Rise up, Big Blue Nation, and occupy Commonwealth Stadium. Joker Phillips is the Billy Gillispie of college football.

He might be a good coach, but he just doesn't fit at the University of Kentucky.

He might have worn the blue and white at one time, but the pride of Kentucky doesn't shine in him.

Phillips should take time to listen to the fans and Coach John Calipari and maybe he would understand what coaching a sport in Kentucky is all about. Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart: The fans are speaking. You need to listen.

Kenneth Michael Watson

Lexington


Libertarian conflicts

Who is John Galt? Well, he is a fictional character in a made-up story by philosopher Ayn Rand about some psychopathic narcissists who withdraw from society to live on a commune.

Someone like a real John Galt is Lloyd Blankfein, self-indulgent CEO of a company whose employees persuaded clients to buy securities they privately equated with poop. Can you say fraud?

Another example, our U.S. Sen. Rand Paul told Rachel Maddow the 1964 Civil Rights Act should not apply to private businesses. He said later he would have voted for the Civil Rights Act. Is that a flip-flop?

He wants to end Medicare because of some esoteric ideological mumbo-jumbo. Didn't he become wealthy enough billing Medicare that he could quit working and get into politics?

I called his office, asking him to support the American Jobs Act. He said the way to create jobs is through deregulation and tax cuts for job creators. Has that ever worked?

He is all about liberty. He wants liberty for corporations — they are people. Yet he stands opposed to liberty for labor to organize for collective bargaining. Isn't labor people?

Aren't all libertarians really Republicans? Wasn't Rand pro-choice? Didn't libertarian economics guru Friedrich Hayek favor government intervention in markets and support environmental regulation? I am so confused.

It boils down to this: Christopher Beam for New York magazine succinctly writes, "... everyone pursuing their own self-interest would yield not Atlas Shrugged but Lord of the Flies."

Doug Epling

Lexington


Protecting the rich

Democratic President John Kennedy and his brother, Attorney General Robert Kennedy, helped the working middle class and the poor. Both were killed. Martin Luther King Jr. helped all women and people of color get better jobs and more freedoms. He was killed.

James Hoffa helped the working middle class and the poor get better pay by forming unions. Killed?

Unions helped factory workers, teachers, police and firefighters, which just happen to be the backbone of this nation.

But since the big corporations and insurance companies bought out the Republican Party (via lobbyists), all the good-paying manufacturing jobs went to the South, Far East, to Europe and the Philippines. Ross Perot warned everybody this would happen, and they called him crazy.

Now, not only do we have to buy inferior products, we have to pay higher prices, with limited incomes. That's why people are buying Toyotas. They are made in the United States, they employ U.S. workers with good wages, the cars are made well and are sold at a decent price.

Now Republican leaders talk of helping the small-business people, who can only afford to pay minimum wages. And this will help the economy?

In reality, the Republicans are protecting the ultra rich from paying their fair share of taxes. A flat-rate tax on personal income, with no write-offs, is needed now.

Bring the jobs back to the United States or charge very high import fees. If it doesn't say made in the U.S.A., don't buy it.

Alberta Toomey

Lexington


Pedestrian's lament

In regard to the installation of sidewalks along Tates Creek Pike, Councilman Julian Beard states in the Nov. 10 Herald-Leader, "People who live on Tates Creek are not going to walk with a little basket on their arm to Lansdowne Shopping Center. They're going to get in their Mercedes and drive." OK.

I guess the rest of the people of Lexington can just eat cake. I'm saddened to live in his district.

Duke Martin

Lexington


Runners, be careful

This letter is for all the runners who gather at the corner of Tates Creek and Turkey Foot Road around 6 a.m.

First of all, the road is not a gathering place to chat, especially standing in the middle expecting cars to swerve around you.

And as you are coming up to the corner, don't run in the middle of Tates Creek. You will be hit sometime.

Lastly, do not wear dark clothing; people can't see you until they are right upon you. Again, you will be hit.

I realize most people don't have a lot of common sense anymore. They expect their computers, phones, tablets, etc., to have all the answers for them, but if these runners don't find some common sense soon there will be a tragedy.

Pete Horine

Lexington


People forgotten

Sen. Mitch McConnell is a selfish person who puts himself ahead of Kentucky and America. His only goal is to make Barack Obama a one-term president.

We need someone who will be for the people first, last and in between.

It's hard to believe the same state that had Abe Lincoln and Henry Clay could now have Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul.

Myrna Sholty

Lexington


Too fast for roads

Why are there 55 mph speed-limit signs on Ironworks Pike and Russell Cave Road?

From Georgetown Road to Newtown Pike the road is wider, but from Newtown Pike to Russell Cave Road and on to Paris Pike, the road is too narrow for that speed.

There are all types of trucks and large horse vans that travel that road.

I have had several cars and a large horse van lay on their horns and fly past me.

Also a 55 mph sign has been placed on Russell Cave Road, just before crossing the bridge over Interstate 75 going north.

I think everyone knows how many people have been killed on Russell Cave Road.

The same is going to happen on Ironworks Pike.

I spoke with a Lexington police officer out near the Kentucky Horse Park, and he said he was baffled as to why this was done and said, "If a 55 mph sign is there, people will go 65," and he is right.

On Paris Pike, out to the Thoroughbred Center, the speed limit is 45 mph, and it is four lanes with a median between.

Makes no sense.

Helen Peppiatt

Lexington

Save the paper

I wrote a few years ago suggesting some deep pockets in Central Kentucky buy the Herald-Leader.

Now would be a good time since McClatchy is in trouble and is driving the paper straight downhill. Maybe shares could be sold.

It's time for a locally owned Herald-Leader.

Don Foster

Georgetown

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