Letters to the Editor

Letters to editor: Dec. 22

300 dpi 2 col x 9.25 in / 96x235 mm / 327x799 pixels John Roberge color illustration of Madonna and child. Tallahassee Democrat 2003


KEYWORDS: krtchristmas nativity religion christianity catholic church madonna virgin child baby christmas mother illustration natividad cristianismo bebe navidad nacimiento madre ilustracion grabado contributed ta roberge 2003 easter christmas
300 dpi 2 col x 9.25 in / 96x235 mm / 327x799 pixels John Roberge color illustration of Madonna and child. Tallahassee Democrat 2003 KEYWORDS: krtchristmas nativity religion christianity catholic church madonna virgin child baby christmas mother illustration natividad cristianismo bebe navidad nacimiento madre ilustracion grabado contributed ta roberge 2003 easter christmas KRT

Downtown lacks holiday spirit, misses opportunity

Where are all the Christmas or "holiday" lights that once lined the streets of downtown Lexington?

My wife and I drove down Main Street the other night and we noticed that it was completely dark from Midland Avenue down to Triangle Park. Other than a tree here and there, there was nothing; not even a storefront window was decorated.

I understand that the ice rink is a good thing, but other than that and a leaning holiday tree, downtown Lexington has nothing as far as lights and decoration to celebrate the season. Have we come that far that we are to lose our small-town feel?

Downtown should be a showcase of wonderful Christmas lights to bring in the public to enjoy, not a dark and dreary place to avoid. Needless to say, we drove to the surrounding townships to walk around and spend our money.

I am proud of our city. Let's light it back up.

David A. Smith

Lexington


A note to burglars

On Nov. 21, my home was broken into while my husband and I were at work. After the birth of our son we set him up with a savings account and a homemade bank in the form of an industrial glass jug. Since he was old enough to grasp a coin we have had a tradition: Three or four times a week we give him all of our silver change and he carefully places each coin in his bank one at a time. Grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins have also contributed to this account. The money he received from his first birthday all went into the jug.

The intruders emptied all but a few single bills from this jug.

Of course I was upset that our privacy had been invaded and that we lost a significant amount of money, but I feel for the intruder as well. People who are so desperate that they have to break into another family's home and steal from them must have a tremendous burden on their shoulders.

This letter is intended to let the intruders know that I forgive them for their actions. Make no mistake; I do not want them to visit again. But I forgive them.

I ask that they spend the money on a good cause or on someone they love this Christmas. I also write to let them know that they are in my prayers. I pray that 2012 may find them in a situation where they no longer have to pilfer from hard-working people.

Amanda Underwood

Nicholasville


Missing old-time yuletide

By the standards of my community, I am a liberal. At Christmastime, however, I long for the past when Christmas was about celebrating the birth of a child of lowly status who was born in a manger and would become the savior of a sinful world. I miss the days when a community could display a simple manger scene without provoking lawsuits.

When did Christmas go from being a simple message about love and forgiveness spread by a man/God born in the humblest of circumstances to an obsessive message that thou shalt max out thy credit cards for the good of country and the economy?

I have no ready answer; I only know that regardless of religious affiliation, the values of love, humility and forgiveness that Jesus espoused have never been needed more than now. To pretend that Christmas is instead about hitting Black Friday at Macy's is just more evidence of the trivialization of everything of meaning in our society.

When it comes to Christmas, this liberal longs for the good old days. Merry Christmas to all, and let's remember the reason for this season.

Sean Detisch

Alexandria


Grateful for what we have

One night at bd's Mongolian Grill, I witnessed one of the nicest gestures from a stranger, a heartfelt moment that brought tears to my eyes as well as the rest of the servers working that night.

A middle-aged man was sitting at a table by himself. Anna was his server. He called her over for his check but also said, "I'd like to pay for that family over there. Their whole check, appetizers, desserts, everything." Anna raised an eyebrow but brought him the bill. He paid and tipped for that table, as well as his own check.

She asked, "Umm, sir, do you know that family?" He replied, "No, but today's my birthday and I lost my family. I just wanted to do something for someone else ... don't drink and drive."

He left before the family could thank him, simply because he didn't want the recognition. We never caught his name nor found out the whole story on how he lost his loved ones. But I can assure you this small act of kindness was anything but that. It was an eye-opener to the rest of us.

Rather than wishing for material things this holiday season, be grateful for what you have, and for what cannot be replaced.

Nicole Farmer

Lexington


In times like these

This year has not been fantastic. Disagreements have estranged my twin girls from their grandparents. Death has taken a brother, an uncle and an unborn grandbaby. Economic conditions have almost sunk my family. Medical bills have piled up and the weight can be crushing.

The latest blow is that my family and I have been evicted from a home we have lived in for almost seven years, but my landlady is in a difficult spot also and is selling the home. We are literally hours away from being homeless.

One thing I can say, however, is that I thank God for the valley he chose for me. I don't have the answers for my problems, but God does. In a time of year when we all struggle to find the perfect gift or we get angry at a crowded department store, we should be thankful for our blessings.

Many of us are a job loss or a severe disease away from being homeless or bankrupt.

I wish each and everyone of you a Merry Christmas, not happy holidays. For there would be no Christmas without Christ.

Donny Riley

Martin


Everyday 'angels'

There is a tendency in today's climate of negativity to forget all the good that goes on around us every day. This is not the case at Northpoint Health Care facility in Lexington.

My wife and I attended its annual Christmas party and feel compelled to publicly express our heartfelt thanks to the "angels" who gave their time and energy to make a lovely party for the blessed residents who live there. The administrators, nurses, nurse aides and volunteers — the "angels" — put together this party every year.

You can see and feel the love, caring and almost giddy glee the "angels" get out of polishing fingernails, fixing hair, putting on makeup and dressing up the folks who cannot do these things for themselves. The "angels" do this for no other reason than they are wonderful, positive-thinking individuals with a lot of love inside them.

Elizabeth Thornton has put together a "climate of positivity" at Northpoint, and she and her staff need to know just how people feel who have loved ones under their care. My family and I are thankful not only at this time of the year, but throughout the year for the selfless efforts of these "angels."

Wayne and Margaret Roberts

Georgetown

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