Letters to the Editor

Letters to the editor on Ferguson: Dec. 7

Seek truth regardless of skin color

As a man of color and having lived a long, successful life, it pains me to watch the looting and pillaging of Ferguson, Mo. The marchers, protestors and so-called black leaders didn't seem to care so much about fairness as retribution.

Justice for the young man who died, who was apparently a hoodlum and confronted a police officer, is not a grand jury's job. Finding the truth is. How about justice for the police officer?

Although Africa-American, I have been witness to the open hatred spewed upon officials of all colors by street-wise, unemployed troublemakers in Detroit and Kansas. Wear a badge for one week in those cities, then call me.

I want the truth to come out, no matter what color a man's skin. To protest, demand consequences and impugn someone's reputation before all the facts are in is asinine.

Harold Shipley

LexingtonWho held gun not the whole story

If Americans remember nothing else about Ferguson, Mo., we will always remember that Michael Brown was an "unarmed teenager." The phrase has been repeated so often, it almost seems intended to be the last word in the case.

Are we to assume that no mere lad of 18 would go looking for trouble without a gun in hand? Brown apparently didn't need one to pull off a petty robbery just minutes before the fatal shooting, nor to attack a police officer through the open window of his cruiser.

The media, whose hunger for racist-runs-amok narratives would be embarrassing if they were still capable of embarrassment, covered the Trayvon Martin story in the same manner, missing few chances to remind the public that Martin was unarmed. Again, why the emphasis, if not to suggest that lack of a firearm establishes innocence?

In a perfect world, violent confrontations would never arise when only one party possesses lethal force. But the real world is messy; senseless things happen every day. When bloodshed results, knowing who held the gun does not equate to knowing the whole story.

Michael Smith

Cynthiana

Where are the voices of reason?

Where is our moral leadership? Those leading the violence in Ferguson, Mo., hide behind masks and the dark of night. Black leadership attempts to justify violence over the death of a black young man who had just robbed a business and attempted to assault and disarm a white police officer. Why not more calls for reason, law and order, and peace in this terrible situation? If this had been a white youth in the same situation, killed by a black police officer, would there have been such an outcry? There must be voices of reason in this country, but we are not hearing their leadership. Why?

John Mitchell

Lexington

Tea Party silent on rogue cops

I respect that the Herald-Leader has to represent both sides of a controversy, but we don't need more word vomit from a hack like columnist Mona Charen. She claims that DNA evidence shows that Darren Wilson justifiably feared for his life after cussing at Mike Brown.

However, the chain of evidence at the crime scene was compromised. Wilson washed the blood off his hands and bagged his own gun after some time. There was no preservation of evidence, so any story presented by the police department is worthless.

I'm surprised we haven't heard more from the Tea Party on the issue of government violence against citizens. The Tea Party hates government so much they get elected just to fail at their jobs. Yet they remain silent on the subject of rogue cops and the subsequent cover-ups by law enforcement.

I guess the Tea Party's position is whatever their pals in the Ku Klux Klan want it to be.

Molly VanZant

Lexington

Brown's parents set bad example

Why is no one in the media challenging Michael Brown's parents about their son's disrespectful, bullying behavior?

If his parents had been good role models for how to conduct oneself in public and behave responsibly and respectfully, we would not have a dead teenager.

I'm tired of watching his mother point fingers. She, his father and others need to take responsibility for their part of the problem. Their son was in trouble and causing trouble — stealing, doing drugs and behaving like a bully.

You get what you give. His behavior was violent and so very combative. If he had made better choices and had a different/positive attitude he would be alive today.

Elizabeth Wallen

Springfield

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