Op-Ed

Stop abortion to save lives, our humanity

Abortion opponents across the nation protested the 38th anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision last week.
Abortion opponents across the nation protested the 38th anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision last week. AP

At issue | Jan 21 New York Times article, "House GOP plans string of bills to replace health care law; stricter abortion limits also sought"

The chief purpose of government is to protect the life and property of its citizens. There have been 58 million surgical abortions in the last 38 years under Roe v. Wade. Our government has failed to protect unborn citizens from this barbaric practice because the majority opinion in Roe stated that at that time, no one knew when life began.

Today, medical science gives us a virtual window into the womb via high definition ultrasounds and fetal photography. We now know that unborn babies are both fully human and fully alive. They have a heartbeat 18 days after conception.

The entire case of abortion rights and a woman's right to choose was built upon lies.

The Jane Roe in Roe v. Wade, Norma McCorvey, never actually had an abortion herself. In 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court, in a 7-2 decision, decided there was a right to privacy in the shadows of the Constitution.

This perpetuated another lie: The Constitution gives a woman a right to have her child killed by an abortionist. You will not find the word "privacy" anywhere in the Constitution, neither the right to kill or own a human being.

In 1969, attorneys Sarah Weddington and Linda Coffee were seeking to overturn a Texas statute that outlawed abortion. They needed a desperate plaintiff and found the perfect candidate in Norma McCorvey, a 22-year old divorcee who was pregnant for the third time.

McCorvey was a tough-talking former waitress, former construction worker and carnival barker. She was poor and uneducated and had abused drugs and alcohol for most of her life.

She told the court that her pregnancy was the result of a gang rape. Therefore, she "needed" an abortion and she deserved the right to choose. On March 17, 1970, McCorvey signed the affidavit that made her Jane Roe.

On Jan. 22, 1973, the Supreme Court, in its landmark decision, Roe v. Wade, along with its companion case, Doe v. Bolton, decided that abortion on demand was legal. McCorvey said at the time she thought she was doing something good.

After years spent working in abortion clinics, McCorvey became worn down by the weight of what she experienced there. The full realization that she had allowed herself to be used as a pawn by the very attorneys who now shunned her weighed heavily on her heart.

McCorvey credited the prayers of pro-life people praying outside abortion clinics with saving her own life. She had a true religious conversion and further recounts her life in the book, Won by Love.

Today, she is an advocate for human life from the womb to the tomb and has become a soft-spoken but courageous voice for ending abortion in America.

Most people know personal responsibility is central to a functioning free society. When Roe v. Wade legalized abortion, it enshrined sex for amusement and perpetuated the illusion of sex without consequences.

It has been a frontal assault on our culture of personal responsibility.

Removing marriage as the framework for sex and children has produced results that don't surprise. Since abortion became legal, we've gone from 10 percent of American babies born to unwed mothers in 1970 to 40 percent today.

Abortion is particularly cruel for black Americans. A black child has a 50 percent chance of being aborted and, if born, a 70 percent chance of living in a single-parent home. The nation's No. 1 abortion provider, Planned Parenthood, gets $300 million annually from the federal government to perpetuate this dismal reality.

We must continue the work of overturning this law because of the destruction it causes. Pope John Paul II said, "A nation that destroys its own children is a nation without hope."

Just as abolitionists pushed for the Dred Scott decision of 1857 that began the legal road to outlawing slavery, we must continue the work of outlawing abortion if we are to have any chance of rescuing our own humanity.

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