Morning Newsletter

Drenching rain continues; snow could be next

Umbrellas were in abundance on campus near the Administration Building on the University of Kentucky campus in Lexington, Ky., Monday, November, 28, 2011. A flood watch is in effect as rain is in the forecast for the remainder of the day. Charles Bertram | Staff
Umbrellas were in abundance on campus near the Administration Building on the University of Kentucky campus in Lexington, Ky., Monday, November, 28, 2011. A flood watch is in effect as rain is in the forecast for the remainder of the day. Charles Bertram | Staff

The steady rain that drenched Lexington all day Monday might continue and could even turn into a little snow by Tuesday night.

A 50 percent chance of rain was forecast for Tuesday, and a 50 percent chance of light rain or snow for Tuesday night, said Tom Reaugh, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Louisville.

Any snow the area gets will be "really light" and mixed with rain, so there will be no accumulation, Reaugh said. There's also a 30 percent chance of a snow shower on Wednesday morning, he said.

Tuesday's high should be 43, with a low of 35 Tuesday night. Wednesday's high will be 42.

Monday's rainfall set a record for the date, and 2011 is now the third-wettest year on record for Lexington.

Lexington had gotten 1.77 inches of rain by 10 p.m. Monday, and Reaugh said more could fall overnight. He said the previous record for Nov. 28 was set in 1949, when the city got 1.12 inches.

As of 10 p.m. Monday, Lexington had received 61.59 inches, which is 20.61 inches higher than normal. Reaugh said 1935 is the wettest year on record. The city got 65.76 inches that year. 2004 is the second-wettest year, with 62.44 inches.

Central Kentucky was under a flood watch through 7 a.m. Tuesday, and Reaugh said several rivers and streams were expected to hit flood stage.

In Paris, he said, Stoner Creek could swell to 18.6 feet by early Tuesday morning. At 18 feet, low-lying roads to one side of the creek flood.

"It's been such a long, drawn-out, steady rain," Reaugh said.

Lexington police responded to more than 60 wrecks on Monday, and about a dozen of those involved injuries, Lexington police Sgt. Brad Ingram said.

A tractor-trailer crash blocked at least one lane of Interstate 75 for about five hours Monday, police spokeswoman Sherelle Roberts said.

The injury wreck closed all of I-75 southbound at the northern I-64 split before 9 a.m. Monday. One lane was opened about two hours later, but traffic was congested for hours, Lexington traffic engineer Chris Quan said.

A large amount of fuel was spilled in the road, and one lane of the ramp from I-75 to eastbound I-64 was closed while hazardous-materials and environmental crews worked to clean it up.

Almost as soon as that was clear, another crash on the ramp caused the left lane to be closed briefly until a damaged car could be removed.

Several other injury and non-injury wrecks were reported in both northbound and southbound lanes near the split through the course of the day. Roberts said she had not received any reports of high water by late Monday.

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