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NASCAR: Roush remains hospitalized, stable after plane crash

A Beechcraft Premier business jet piloted by NASCAR team owner Jack Roush sustained severe damage during an attempted landing at the Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wisc., on Tuesday. Both Roush and a passenger, Brenda Stricklin, survived the crash. Stricklin was treated and released from an area hospital.
A Beechcraft Premier business jet piloted by NASCAR team owner Jack Roush sustained severe damage during an attempted landing at the Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wisc., on Tuesday. Both Roush and a passenger, Brenda Stricklin, survived the crash. Stricklin was treated and released from an area hospital. AP

MILWAUKEE — NASCAR team owner Jack Roush remained hospitalized in serious but stable condition Wednesday, one day after he walked away from a plane crash in Wisconsin.

In a statement, Roush Fenway Racing said Roush is under observation for facial injuries he sustained in the accident.

The team said Roush's passenger, his friend Brenda Stricklin, was treated and released from the hospital Wednesday afternoon.

"On behalf of the NASCAR industry our hearts and prayers go out to Jack Roush, the Roush family and Roush Fenway Racing," NASCAR chairman and CEO Brian France said in a statement. "All of us are looking forward to a full and speedy recovery."

Roush — an aviation buff who survived another crash in 2002 — was attending the Experimental Aircraft Association's annual AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wis. According to the EAA, a Beechcraft Premier business jet registered to Roush Fenway Racing, LLC was involved in a landing accident at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh around 6:15 p.m. Tuesday.

With Roush at the controls, the plane crashed while attempting to land. Photos from the scene showed serious damage, with the tail section cracked away from the rest of the plane.

Witnesses told the Green Bay Press Gazette that the plane was coming in too low and too slow as it approached the south end of the airport's north-south runway, which caused the plane to start to roll. The nose hit the ground, the plane spun 180 degrees, and the tail broke off.

"It looked like a bad approach, and he over-corrected and then crashed," Mark Yarnell of New Philadelphia, Ohio, told the paper.

Roush Fenway Racing president Geoff Smith told The Associated Press that Roush is expected to recover.

It is the second close call in an airplane for Roush, who crashed into a lake in Alabama eight years ago and nearly drowned before being rescued by an ex-Marine who lived nearby. Despite sustaining serious injuries, Roush continued flying.

After having success in dragsters and sports car racing, Roush — a former Ford engineer and college physics teacher — founded his NASCAR team in 1988.

Known for his trademark Panama-style hat, academic speaking style and love for tinkering with anything mechanical, he won championships in NASCAR's top series with Matt Kenseth in 2003 and Kurt Busch in 2004.

Since 2007, Roush has partnered with the Fenway Sports Group, the sports marketing arm of the Boston Red Sox's parent company. The team currently fields cars in the Cup series for Kenseth, Carl Edwards, Greg Biffle and David Ragan.

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