Ex-Cats

Lakers’ Julius Randle working to get a handle on his shooting problems

Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle, right, shots against New Orleans Pelicans forward Luke Babbitt on Jan. 12 in Los Angeles.
Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle, right, shots against New Orleans Pelicans forward Luke Babbitt on Jan. 12 in Los Angeles. Associated Press

Julius Randle stayed late after practice. He took shot after shot after shot.

The Los Angeles Lakers power forward put up 14-footers from the left side, 18-footers from the right.

More than anybody, the former University of Kentucky star knows his touch is lacking.

Lakers consultant James Worthy was there, helping out. The team’s shooting coach, Tracy Murray, watched and instructed as well.

“Right now I just need to work on my pace. I get in the game, and I get amped up, going fast, and sometimes I rush my shot,” Randle said Tuesday after an extra 45 minutes of work. “I’m not sticking to my fundamentals, my technique I’ve been working on. It’s slowing down my shot.”

Randle worked briefly on another area of his game. Teams have figured out that he relies heavily on his left hand, so he worked on some up-and-under post moves Tuesday in which he finished with his right hand.

Randle is shooting only 40.5 percent in his first full NBA season, last among the 21 power forwards eligible for statistical consideration.

Sometimes I rush my shot. I’m not sticking to my fundamentals, my technique I’ve been working on.

Julius Randle

It would be one thing if he had as many three-point attempts as New Orleans big man Ryan Anderson, who is shooting 43.9 percent overall. But Anderson has taken 204 three-point shots, Randle 18.

Randle does well in the rebounding department, averaging 9.4 in only 26.4 minutes a game, but his shaky shot keeps him from scoring more than his 10.6-point average.

The extra work will eventually pay off, he hopes.

“It helps me a lot to feel confident,” Randle said.

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