UK Men's Basketball

Where are they now?: The 25 players from the 2013 McDonald’s All-American Game

UK had a record six McDonald's All Americans in 2013. From left, Julius Randle, Aaron Harrison, Dakari Johnson, Andrew Harrison, James Young and Marcus Lee.
UK had a record six McDonald's All Americans in 2013. From left, Julius Randle, Aaron Harrison, Dakari Johnson, Andrew Harrison, James Young and Marcus Lee.

The best high school basketball seniors in the country will be in Chicago this week for the McDonald’s All-American Game, the annual showcase featuring the top recruits from around the nation.

Here’s an annual reminder that being selected for this game doesn’t necessarily lead to pro success: Of the 25 players who made the 2013 McDonald’s Game, only 13 have played in the NBA so far.

That highly touted group of recruits — who would all be seniors if they stayed in school and played for their original college teams — included Andrew Wiggins, Julius Randle, Jabari Parker and several other promising young stars. It also was the year that Kentucky had six future players in the game, setting a McDonald’s record that stands.

Here’s a look at what those 25 McDonald’s All-Americans from four years ago did after the game, and where they are now:

EAST TEAM

Anthony Barber

The No. 24 overall recruit in the 2013 class, “Cat” Barber played three seasons at North Carolina State — averaging 23.5 points and 4.5 assists per game as a junior — before declaring for the NBA Draft in 2016. He wasn't selected in that draft and has been in the NBA Development League since. Last month, he was traded from the Delaware 87ers to the Greensboro Swarm for Aaron Harrison.

Pro ball: No NBA experience

Keith Frazier

Frazier — the No. 27 recruit in the class — announced his commitment to Southern Methodist during McDonald’s Game week. He played two-plus seasons there before leaving the program midway through his junior year. He was at the center of the NCAA’s investigation into SMU’s program that led to a postseason ban and lost scholarships. Frazier transferred to North Texas but played just four games with the Mean Green because of knee injuries.

Pro ball: Not among top 100 prospects for 2017 draft

Isaiah Hicks

The No. 14 recruit in the 2013 class played sparingly as a freshman at North Carolina — averaging just 1.2 points in 7.3 minutes per game — before becoming a key player for the Tar Heels. Hicks is averaging 12.3 points and 5.6 rebounds per game for Final Four-bound UNC this season.

Pro ball: Ranked No. 93 among prospects for the 2017 draft

Kasey Hill

Hill was one of the top point guards in the 2013 class and a high school teammate of Dakari Johnson. He signed with Florida and averaged 5.5 points and 3.1 assists per game as a freshman. Hill started 93 games in his career with the Gators, averaging 9.7 points and 4.5 assists as a senior this season.

Pro ball: Not among top 100 prospects for 2017 draft

Rondae Hollis-Jefferson

He signed with Arizona as the No. 16 overall recruit in the 2013 class and played two seasons for the Wildcats, averaging 11.2 points and 6.8 rebounds per game as a sophomore before declaring for the 2015 NBA Draft. Hollis-Jefferson was selected with the No. 23 overall pick by the Portland Trail Blazers, then was traded to the Brooklyn Nets. He’s now in his second season with the Nets.

Pro ball: 8.4 ppg, 5.5 rpg, 21.9 mpg for Nets this season

Demetrius Jackson

The No. 33 overall recruit in the class and a South Bend, Ind., native, Jackson played three seasons at Notre Dame — averaging 15.8 points and 4.7 assists per game as a junior — before declaring for last year’s NBA Draft. He was selected by the Boston Celtics with the No. 45 overall pick and has played primarily in the D-League this season. He has played in five NBA games in 2016-17.

Pro ball: 2.0 ppg, 0.8 rpg, 3.4 mpg for Celtics this season

Dakari Johnson

Johnson reclassified from the 2014 class to the 2013 class so he could enroll at Kentucky a year early, coming to the Wildcats as a top-10 recruit. The 7-foot center — who played for Sayre as an eighth-grader before moving to New Jersey — was a role player for the Wildcats for two seasons, averaging 6.4 points and 4.6 rebounds in 16.3 minutes per game as part of UK’s “platoon” system two years ago. He declared for the 2015 draft and was selected by the Oklahoma City Thunder with the No. 48 overall pick. He has been a star player for OKC’s D-League team but has yet to appear for the Thunder.

Pro ball: No NBA experience

Kennedy Meeks

The lowest-ranked recruit in the 2013 McDonald’s Game — at No. 56 overall — Meeks was nearly 320 pounds when he enrolled at North Carolina as a freshman, but he has completely reshaped his body since his high school days. Meeks averaged 16.3 minutes per game as a freshman and is now a major contributor for the Final Four-bound Tar Heels, averaging 12.5 points and a team-high 9.1 rebounds per game this season.

Pro ball: Not among top 100 prospects for 2017 draft

Julius Randle

After Randle missed nearly all of his senior season with a broken foot, the McDonald’s selection committee made an exception to their eligibility rules and named him to the game based on his stellar high school career before that injury. Randle was healed by the time he showed up in Chicago, and — as the No. 2 overall recruit in the class — got a lot of attention that week. Randle ended up leading Kentucky in scoring (15.0 points) and rebounding (10.4 boards) as a freshman, helping to lead the Cats all the way to the national title game. He was the No. 7 overall pick by the Los Angeles Lakers in 2014 but suffered a season-ending injury in his first regular-season NBA game.

Pro ball: 13.3 ppg, 8.7 rpg, 29.0 mpg for Lakers this season

Wayne Selden

The No. 13 recruit in 2013, Selden was Kansas’ highest-ranked commitment in that class until No. 1 prospect Andrew Wiggins pledged to the Jayhawks. Selden averaged 9.7 points and 2.5 assists as a freshman at Kansas, playing three seasons of college basketball before entering last year’s NBA Draft. He wasn't selected in the draft and ended up with the Iowa Energy in the D-League. He made his NBA debut earlier this month with the New Orleans Pelicans, playing out a 10-day contract with that team before eventually signing a longer deal with the Memphis Grizzlies.

Pro ball: 4.4 ppg, 1.4 rpg, 12.8 mpg for Pelicans/Grizzlies this season

Noah Vonleh

The No. 8 recruit in the 2013 class, Vonleh averaged 11.3 points and 9.0 rebounds in his one season with the Indiana Hoosiers, earning Big Ten freshman of the year honors along the way. Vonleh was selected with the No. 9 overall pick in the 2014 draft by the Charlotte Hornets and played in 25 games as a rookie. He was traded after that season to the Portland Trail Blazers, and he has averaged about 15 minutes a game for that team over the past two seasons.

Pro ball: 3.9 ppg, 4.7 rpg, 15.4 mpg for Trail Blazers this season

Chris Walker

UK never offered a scholarship, but Walker continued to list the Cats in his recruitment all the way up until the day he committed to Florida. If UK had offered, Walker probably would have been a Wildcat, but it turns out Kentucky didn’t miss much production. Walker had to enroll at Florida late because of academic concerns, missing the first part of his freshman season. He then sat 12 more games while the NCAA investigated amateurism concerns. In two seasons with the Gators, he averaged 3.7 points and 2.7 rebounds in 11.0 minutes per game. During his sophomore year, Sports Illustrated labeled him as one of the most disappointing players in the country. Walker declared for the 2015 draft, wasn't chosen and ultimately ended up in the D-League. He has played for the Rio Grande Valley Vipers ever since.

Pro ball: No NBA experience

Andrew Wiggins

He was one of the best high school players in recent years and the undisputed No. 1 recruit in the 2013 class, and all eyes were on Wiggins when he came to Chicago four years ago, still undecided on which college he would play for. Kentucky, Florida State, Kansas and North Carolina were the finalists, and it would be six more weeks before he finally committed to the Jayhawks — ending the most-followed recruitment in years. Wiggins put up 17.1 points and 5.9 rebounds a game playing under enormous expectations at Kansas. He was the No. 1 pick in the 2014 draft, but the Cleveland Cavaliers traded him to the Minnesota Timberwolves in the deal that included Kevin Love. Wiggins averaged 16.9 points per game and won NBA rookie of the year honors in the 2014-15 season.

Pro ball: 23.1 ppg, 4.0 rpg, 37.2 mpg for Timberwolves this season

WEST TEAM

Jabari Bird

Bird, who signed with California, was the No. 20 overall recruit in the 2013 class. He is now in his fourth year with the Bears and has played at least 20 minutes per game in every season of his college career. Bird averaged 14.3 points and 4.7 rebounds as a senior this season. He is not projected as an NBA draft pick.

Pro ball: Not among top 100 prospects for 2017 draft

Aaron Gordon

Andre Wiggins was an exciting prospect and the clear No. 1 recruit in the class, but Gordon was the high school senior who starred on YouTube that season. The highly athletic California native’s mixtapes were ridiculous, and he eventually committed to Arizona in a recruitment that included UK on his final list. Gordon — the No. 4 recruit in the class — averaged 12.4 points and 8.0 rebounds per game in his only season with the Wildcats and was selected by the Orlando Magic with the No. 4 overall pick in the 2014 draft. He also was the MVP of the McDonald’s Game four years ago, scoring 24 points and grabbing eight rebounds in the all-star showcase.

Pro ball: 11.9 ppg, 4.7 rpg, 27.9 mpg for Magic this season

Isaac Hamilton

Hamilton originally signed with UTEP as the No. 19 overall recruit in the 2013 class, then he decided he wanted to play for UCLA instead. UTEP wouldn't grant him a release from his letter of intent, so Hamilton was forced to sit out the entire 2013-14 college season. Now a junior — he has averaged 30-plus minutes per game in all of his seasons with the Bruins — Hamilton was on the floor against Kentucky on Friday night in the Sweet 16. Hamilton is not projected as a NBA Draft pick this year.

Pro ball: Not among top 100 prospects for 2017 draft

Aaron Harrison

The shooting guard in the Harrison duo, Aaron was the No. 6 overall player in the 2013 class and made several big shots in the NCAA Tournament as a freshman to help lead UK to an appearance in the national title game. He averaged 13.7 points that season — third on the team — and led the 2014-15 “platoon” team in scoring with 11.0 points per game. Harrison declared for the 2015 draft, went undrafted and eventually signed with the Charlotte Hornets. He has played in 26 regular-season NBA games over the past two seasons (but just five games this season).

Pro ball: 0.2 ppg, 0.6 apg, 3.4 mpg for Hornets this season

Andrew Harrison

The point guard in the Harrison duo, Andrew was ranked as the No. 5 player in the 2013 class and was UK’s starting point guard for two seasons, leading the Wildcats in assists both years. The Phoenix Suns selected him with the No. 44 overall pick in the 2015 draft, and he was then traded to the Memphis Grizzlies. He played in the D-League during the 2015-16 season and made his NBA debut with the Grizzlies this season.

Pro ball: 6.0 ppg, 2.8 apg, 20.3 mpg for Grizzlies this season

Matt Jones

The No. 34 overall player in the class — and one of only two Duke signees in that year’s McDonald’s Game — Jones played only 7.3 minutes per game as a freshman before taking on an expanded role over the past three seasons. He averaged 7.0 points in 32.9 minutes per game as a senior this season.

Pro ball: Not among top 100 prospects for 2017 draft

Marcus Lee

The lowest-ranked of the six UK recruits in the 2013 McDonald’s Game, Lee was the No. 18 overall prospect in the class. He averaged 2.4 points per game as a freshman (6.3 minutes per game), 2.6 points per game as a sophomore (10.9 minutes per game) and 6.4 points per game as a junior (21.8 minutes per game) before leaving Kentucky after last season and transferring back home to California to play for the Cal Bears. He sat out this season as a transfer and will be eligible to play his senior season in 2017-18.

Pro ball: Not among top 100 prospects for 2017 draft

Jarell Martin

The No. 12 recruit in the class, Martin was an all-SEC freshman team selection and then led LSU in scoring with 16.9 points per game as a sophomore in the 2014-15 season. The Memphis Grizzlies selected Martin with the No. 25 overall pick in the 2015 draft, and he played in 27 NBA games as a rookie.

Pro ball: 3.9 ppg, 3.9 rpg, 13.5 mpg for Grizzlies this season

Jabari Parker

Sports Illustrated once put Parker on the cover, declaring him to be “the best high school basketball player since LeBron James.” Parker was good, but it turned out that he wasn’t even the best prospect in his high school class — finishing at No. 3 in the rankings behind Andrew Wiggins and Julius Randle. Parker averaged 19.1 points and 8.7 rebounds per game in his only season at Duke before being selected by the Milwaukee Bucks with the No. 2 overall pick in the 2014 draft. He suffered a torn ACL early in his rookie season but returned the next year and has been a constant in the Bucks’ starting lineup.

Pro ball: 20.1 ppg, 6.2 rpg, 33.9 mpg for Bucks this season

Bobby Portis

The No. 14 recruit in the class, Portis stayed home in his native Arkansas to play for the Razorbacks, averaging 12.3 points and 6.8 rebounds per game as a freshman. He was the SEC player of the year the next season and declared for the 2015 draft, being selected by the Chicago Bulls with the No. 22 overall pick. He’s now in his second season with the Bulls.

Pro ball: 6.4 ppg, 4.3 rpg, 15.0 mpg for Bulls this season

Nigel Williams-Goss

Williams-Goss was the No. 27 recruit in the 2013 class and originally signed with Washington, playing two seasons for the Huskies before transferring to Gonzaga. He made his debut with the Zags this season after sitting out a transfer year, and he leads the Final Four team in points (16.7 per game) and assists (4.6 per game).

Pro ball: Ranked No. 61 among prospects for the 2017 draft

James Young

Young was a star on the Nike circuit and ended up tied with Dakari Johnson as the No. 9 overall recruit in the 2013 class. As a freshman, he was second on UK’s team in scoring (14.3 points per game) and he led the Wildcats with 82 made three-pointers. Young chose to leave after just one season and was selected with the No. 17 overall pick in the 2014 draft by the Boston Celtics. He spent the first two years of his pro career bouncing between the Celtics and their D-League affiliate.

Pro ball: 2.6 ppg, 1.0 rpg, 8.0 mpg for Celtics this season

All draft projections for current college players are from DraftExpress.com; Recruiting rankings from RSCIHoops.com; NBA stats through Saturday’s games.

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