Horses

WEG entertainment for Sept. 26: Blind Corn Liquor Pickers

The Blind Corn Liquor Pickers, a Lexington band named for a potent whisky made of corn,  perform often at bluegrass music festivals.
The Blind Corn Liquor Pickers, a Lexington band named for a potent whisky made of corn, perform often at bluegrass music festivals.

There aren't as many chicks in the Blind Corn Liquor Pickers as there are in the Dixie Chicks, but the attitude is quite similar.

The Lexington band's forte is roots-based music, but there is a definite willingness to veer into country, rock and other genres. There is also a tongue-in-cheek attitude toward the South and rural life in songs such as Field Cred and Moonshine Bill alongside a poignant seriousness, particularly Park Bench, a song on the Liquor Pickers' latest album, Appalachian Trail.

The song was based on the band's experience when they were playing the Woodland Jubilee in 2007 and a man died lying on a park bench while they played. The dark, haunting song stands at the end of the album in stark contrast to the band's usual hard-driving, party sound.

In addition to playing in Lexington, the Liquor Pickers are a regular act at bluegrass music festivals around the region, sometimes ending up on music journalists' lists of favorite band names.

The name refers to a particularly potent whiskey made mostly from corn.

And the band has earned praise from a wide variety of commentators, including novelist Ed McClanahan, who in the now-defunct Nougat magazine pointed to the Blind Corn Liquor Pickers' versatility.

"These tunes are upbeat, energetic and rousingly high-spirited, the lyrics fresh, wry, witty, intelligent and chock-full of good-natured mischief," he wrote. "If the Beatles were reincarnated as 21st-century punkabilly Kentuckians, they'd probably sound a whole lot like the Blind Corn Liquor Pickers."

  Comments