Horses

Leading sire A.P. Indy retired from breeding

A.P. Indy retired from stud duty at Lane's End Farm in April 2011, but the Thoroughbred legend's influence still looms large in his offspring and his offspring's offspring.
A.P. Indy retired from stud duty at Lane's End Farm in April 2011, but the Thoroughbred legend's influence still looms large in his offspring and his offspring's offspring.

A.P. Indy, the 1992 Horse of the Year and one of the most prolific sires in decades, has been retired from stud duty because of declining fertility, Lane's End Farm announced Friday.

The 22-year-old son of Seattle Slew, who commanded a $300,000 stud fee at one point and most recently stood for $150,000, was bred to 25 mares this year but none was confirmed in foal. The stallion is in good health otherwise and will continue to reside in the stall "he has occupied for almost 20 years," according to William S. Farish of Lane's End, which has stood A.P. Indy his entire career.

"We've had lots of vets all checking and seeing what the situation is but the main thing is he just doesn't have any mares in foal," Farish said. "It is our fondest wish that he will live a long and happy retirement."

A.P. Indy's retirement from stud duty brings to a close a career overflowing with excellence.

Bred by Farish in partnership with Bill Kilroy, A.P. Indy was a star from the moment he was born, selling for $2.9 million at the 1990 Keeneland July yearling sale. That price ended up being a relative bargain as he went on to win eight of 11 career starts, including the 1992 Belmont Stakes and Breeders' Cup Classic to secure year-end honors under the care of trainer Neil Drysdale.

"He's been an outstanding horse for us from the beginning," Farish said. "He was a top yearling, he was such a wonderful racehorse and sire and now as a sire of sires.

"You can certainly go a lifetime and never have a horse do what A.P. has done."

Twice the nation's leading sire in 2003 and 2006, A.P. Indy has sired 11 champions and 136 stakes winners to date with progeny earnings of more than $112.9 million. In an age when speed and precocity began to take over the sport, offspring of A.P. Indy were known for their stamina as evident by his son and fellow Lane's End stallion Mineshaft, who was named the 2003 Horse of the Year.

Along with Mineshaft, the list of A.P. Indy's most notable offspring includes champions Bernardini, Rags to Riches — one of just three fillies to win the Belmont Stakes — and Tempera along such Grade I winners as Tomisue's Delight, Music Note, Aptitude and Golden Missile.

"The thing about him is he's put stamina and soundness into horses and he's been a wonderful horse to breed speed into," Farish said. "What we need more of in the country are sires who produce classic horses and that's what his pedigree has been able to do. I think that will help the breed for many generations."

A.P. Indy covered 80 mares in 2010, according to Jockey Club statistics.

While his days in the breeding shed are over, A.P. Indy's legacy will be carried on for years.

His son Mineshaft has a leading Kentucky Derby contender in Dialed In while Malibu Moon, who stands at Spendthrift, was No. 3 on the general sire list last season. Congrats and Bernardini were first and third on the first-crop sire list in 2010 and Pulpit has become one of the more successful sires for Claiborne Farm.

"He's been the foundation of our farm, there is no question about it," Farish said.

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